ETERNAL SECURITY DEBATE 3: CHERRY PICKER’S SOUFFLE TRIPLE LAYER SPECIAL

There is perhaps no greater mystery to mankind than the thought of what exactly happens to us after we breathe our last breath and travel beyond death’s door. How do you live with dying? How do you cope with a loved one’s declining years? How do you prepare for death… and hold onto hope at the same time?  Even closer to home, how do you unscramble your own thoughts about death?  Many religions offer an answer, but none can be one-hundred percent authenticated and proven in it’s claims like the Bible has proven to be.  This same proven and authenticated Bible has also made some very startling and sobering warnings about the destiny of each and every man and woman’s unprepared eternal soul when death comes … and it is not a pretty picture.  Of course, there is a way of escape from this eternal and irrevocable destiny if one all-important and crucial decision is made before death comes.

THE WAY OUT AND YOU

In order to accept the offer of God’s grace and his salvation, you must take the crucial three steps of

1. Agreeing – A belief and agreeing with God in all that he says in his word, the Bible, about the fact that you are separated from God, as every man and woman on the face of the earth are before accepting his salvation.  The Bible reveals that all are separated from him in a spiritual state of death, or in another way that the Bible puts it, in a state of sin, that will result in eternal damnation.  Agreeing with God in your heart that you are in need of his salvation.  The Bible reveals that God looks upon the heart of a man, and thus, responds accordingly to the man or woman who comes to him for salvation in recognition of his inability to save himself.  The Bible makes these facts very clear – “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23).  “For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:23).  The Bible describes these three kinds of death:  physical death (the state experienced when life leaves our bodies); spiritual death (spiritual separation from God caused by our state of spiritual death, or state of sin that results in outward acts of sin on a daily basis as the Bible also puts it – the state of sin is received from the first man Adam); and finally eternal death (the fixed state entered into by the individual who dies physically while he or she is dead spiritually).  It is eternal death, in particular, which is the horrible result of receiving the wages of sin.  The Lord Jesus Christ frequently described such a death as being eternal (without end) in a destiny which he called Hell.  He described Hell as a literal place of judgment (Matthew 13:42); a place of everlasting fire (Matthew 18:8); a place of torment (Luke 16:24,28); a place of weeping and gnashing of teeth (Matthew 13:50); a place of remorse (Mark 9:44-48); of bitter memory (Luke 16:25), and a place originally prepared for the Devil and his angels (Matthew 25:41).  In fact, Jesus more often warned about Hell than he spoke about Heaven.  It is not God’s will or desire that any person should be consigned to perish in Hell (2 Peter 3:9), but rather that all should come to repentance of unbelief toward him and believe on him for the salvation of the individual’s soul.  But God’s justice requires that the “soul who sins” (remains in it’s state of death or state of sin) is the one who will die eternally (Ezekiel 18:4).  So, agree with God, admitting that you are unable to save yourself and in a state of sin under God’s just condemnation for that sin and that you are in need of his salvation.

2. Believing – Then, believe that God does not want you to perish eternally in the torment of Hell because of your sin.  Believe that God loves you so much that he provided a way whereby he could still be a just, holy and righteous God, and yet pardon you.  Believe that God did not just overlook sin, but that he sent his only begotten son, the Lord Jesus Christ, to provide salvation by personally paying the penalty for sin.  Believe that Jesus Christ, whose life, death, burial and resurrection is the best-attested fact of antiquity, did come to earth to live, die, rise again and ascend to Heaven in order to provide justification and salvation for all who trust him.  Believe that he, and he alone, can save you because he has fully satisfied the just demands of God.  Believe that you can’t become righteous in God’s sight by your own effort.  Believe that he wants to save you and that he will save you.  The Bible provides a solid basis for such belief …

“The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance (2 Peter 3:9).

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.  For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved” (John 3:16-17). 

“But God demonstrates his love toward us in this:  while we were yet sinners,  Christ died for us (Romans 5:8). 

God presented him (Jesus Christ) as a sacrifice of atonement through faith in his blood.  He did this to demonstrate his justice because in his forbearance he had left the sins committed beforehand unpunished – he did it to demonstrate his justice at the present time, so as to be just and the one who justifies the man or woman who has faith in Jesus (Romans 3:25-26). 

Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand; By which also ye are saved, if ye keep in memory what I preached unto you, unless ye have believed in vain.  For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures;  And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures … ” (1 Corinthians 15:1-4). 

“Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved” (Acts 4:12). 

“Jesus answered, “Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me” (John 14:6).  “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28).

“All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out [drive away]” (John 6:37).

“Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me” (Revelation 3:20).

3. Calling – It is not enough to agree with God, admit your need, and believe that Christ can and will save you.  You must act upon those facts.  You must repent of the sin of your unbelief toward him and actively call upon him for the salvation of your soul based on the fact that you cannot save yourself because of your sins.  You must be willing to completely turn from your own efforts to save yourself or from any other hope.  You must come to Christ, calling upon him for salvation and counting on the fact that he will do what he has promised.  This means simply taking the gift of pardon and eternal life which he offers.  Merely believing about Jesus Christ without coming to him makes as much sense and is as effective as believing that a medication can successfully treat a fatal disease, but failing to take it.  Yet again, the Bible emphatically and authoritatively provides the basis for such statements:

“He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God” (John 3:18).  The word translated “believe” here means to “rest one’s entire weight and trust on the object or person in which the belief is placed.”  It requires action in keeping with the intellectual assent of that belief.

“For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Romans 10:13).

” … but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 6:23).

The logical question you may be asking at this point is:  “how do I come to Christ and call upon him?”  The answer is that “calling upon the Lord” is just another term for praying, or talking to God.  To talk to God is not a complicated process, dependent upon some special rituals.  God has invited people to approach him through his Son in simple, straightforward terms.  In fact, Jesus approved of the dishonest, despised tax collector who simply prayed, “God be merciful to me, a sinner.”  While the exact words of your prayer to God are not of vital importance (since God sees and knows the attitude of your heart), the following is the kind of prayer that you could pray in calling upon God for salvation …

“Dear Lord Jesus:  I realize that I need you.  I admit that I have sinned and that I deserve your just, eternal punishment for that sin.  But I am sorry for my sin and I am turning to you and asking for forgiveness.  I believe that you died and rose again to pay sin’s penalty on my behalf.  I come to you and open my heart to you.  I ask you to come into my life, forgive me for all of my sin and make me your child.  I invite you to take control of my life and to cause me to be the kind of person you would have me to be.  I thank you for doing this because you have promised that whosoever calls upon you, as I am doing now, shall be saved.  I pray this in the name of your Son, the Lord Jesus Christ.  Amen.”

If this prayer expresses the desire of your heart, I urge you to sincerely and genuinely express it to God as your prayer.  The Bible makes clear that when we believe on the Lord Jesus Christ in our heart, God forgives our sins and counts us righteous, and that when we openly confess with our mouth what we have done in our heart,  God gives us assurance of that salvation (Romans 10:9-10).

“Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. Nicodemus saith unto him, How can a man be born when he is old? can he enter the second time into his mother’s womb, and be born?  Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.  That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.  Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again” (John 3:3-7).

Now that the way of salvation is known, the next logical and all-important question needs to be answered …  can salvation be lost for any reason once you have received it?  In parts 1 and 2 of this eternal security series, I answered those questions using scripture.  The Bible is clear that once salvation is received, it cannot be lost.  However, there are many sincere, born again and saved Christians who believe that one can indeed lose salvation once it has been received.  As I’ve already mentioned in parts 1 and 2 of this series of articles, this belief is based upon the misinterpretation and “cherry picking” of certain scriptures.

Cherry picking definition:  “(also known as: suppressed evidence, fallacy of incomplete evidence, argument by selective observation, argument by half-truth, card stacking, fallacy of exclusion, ignoring the counter evidence, one-sided assessment, slanting, one-sidedness).  Description: When only select evidence is presented in order to persuade the audience to accept a position, and evidence that would go against the position is withheld. The stronger the withheld evidence, the more fallacious the argument.

Example:  My political candidate gives 10% of his income to the needy, goes to church every Sunday, and volunteers one day a week at a homeless shelter. Therefore, he is honest and morally straight.

Explanation: What information was left out of the example is that this same candidate gives 10% of his income to needy prostitutes in exchange for services, goes to the drug dealer every Sunday after church (and sometimes before), and only works at the homeless shelter to get clients for his drug dealing business.  This is a prime example of cherry picking.

In parts 1 and 2 of this three part series, I pasted certain comments and conversations that I have had with people from the comment sections of certain videos from my youtube channels wherein people have come to the conclusion that salvation can be lost.  I have countered those arguments with what can be conclusively revealed to be the true context of misinterpreted and cherry picked scriptures that reveal the exact opposite … and that is that salvation cannot be lost once received.  Since those first two articles were written, many more comments have surfaced in the comment sections of those videos that present biblical texts not covered in the first two articles that many have expounded upon.  I shall now copy and paste my conversations with those commenters and reveal the true interpretation of those scriptures as it relates to this all-important subject of eternal security.  With all of that said, enjoy the continuing conversation …

it's cherry pickin time

 

JOHN ROBEL – well there is no eternal security when you consider these verses. Hebrews 10:25-29 25 Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching. 26 For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, 27 But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries. 28 He that despised Moses’ law died without mercy under two or three witnesses: 29 Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the

cherry picked cupcake
Screw the cake, give me the cherries.

Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace? The author is obviously talking to Christians who are filled with the Holy Spirit. the sons of Korah that rebelled against Moses in Numbers 16 died and went to hell. They did not believe Moses and by not believing Moses, they rejected God. A smart christian would know that…here it says that the christians will receive a sorer punishment, meaning a more severe punishment in hell. There you have it, christians can lose their salvation. Stop preaching eternal security, it is false. It doesn’t make any sense to say that the believer will receive harsh chastisement because this is saying the christian will receive PUNISHMENT.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – To the contrary, the author is not “obviously” talking about Christians who are filled with the Holy Spirit. Hebrews 10:26 is also taken out of context by those who claim salvation can be lost …

“For if we are willfully sinning after receiving the full knowledge of the truth, there remains no more sacrifice concerning sins.”

Hebrews 10:26-29 warns against the sin of apostasy. Apostasy is an intentional falling away or defection. Apostates are those who move toward Christ, right up to the edge of saving belief, who hear and understand the Gospel, and are on the verge of saving faith, but then reject what they have learned and turn away. These are people who are perhaps even aware of their sin and even make a profession of faith. But rather than going on to spiritual maturity, their interest in Christ begins to diminish, the things of the world have more attraction to them rather than less, and eventually, they lose all desire for the things of God and they turn away. The Lord illustrated these types of people in the second and third soils of Matthew 13:1-9, 18-23. These are those who “receive with joy” the things of the Lord, but who are drawn away by the cares of the world or turned off by difficulties they encounter because of Christ. “Willful sinning” in this passage carries the idea of consciously and deliberately rejecting Christ. To know God’s way, to hear it preached, to study it, to count oneself among the faithful, and then to turn away is to become apostate. Sinning willfully carries with it the idea of sinning continually and deliberately. Such a person does not sin because of ignorance, nor is he carried away by momentary temptations he is too weak to resist. The willful sinner sins because of an established way of thinking and acting which he has no desire to give up. The true believer, on the other hand, is one who lapses into sin and loses temporary fellowship with God. But he will eventually come back to God in repentance because his heavenly Father will continually woo and convict him until he can’t stay away any longer. The true apostate will continue to sin, deliberately, willingly and with abandon. John tells us the following words …

“Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God. (1 John 3:9).

Apostates have knowledge, but no application of that knowledge. They can be found in the presence of the light of Christ, mostly in the church, among God’s people. Judas Iscariot is the perfect example—he had knowledge but he lacked true faith. No other rejector of the truth had more or better exposure to the love and grace of God than Judas. He was part of Jesus’ inner circle of disciples, eating, sleeping, and traveling with Him for years. He saw the miracles and heard the words of God from Jesus’ very lips, from the best preacher the world has ever known, and yet he not only turned away but was instrumental in the plot to kill Jesus. Having turned his back on the truth, and with full knowledge choosing to willfully and continually sin, the apostate is then beyond salvation because he has rejected the one true sacrifice for sins: the Lord Jesus Christ. If Christ’s sacrifice is rejected, then all hope of salvation is gone. To turn away willfully from this sacrifice leaves no sacrifice; it leaves only sin, the penalty for which is eternal death. This passage is not speaking of a believer who falls away, but rather someone who may claim to be a believer, but truly is not. Anyone who apostatizes is proving he never had genuine faith to begin with (1 John 2:19). Bottom line is that this passage of scripture is not speaking about a true, born again believer losing salvation. So, “ehem, ehem,” there you have it … conditional eternal security is a false doctrine. Your statement that “it doesn’t make any sense to say that the believer will receive harsh chastisement because this is saying that he or she will receive harsh punishment” doesn’t stand up to biblical scrutiny. The bible distinguishes between punishment for the unsaved person and the chastisement of the sinning saved, born again believer. “Hebrews 12:6 says …

“For whom the Lord loves he chastens, and scourges every son whom he receives” (Hebrews 12:6).

Another word for “chasten” is “discipline.” The passage goes on to quote Proverbs 3:11-12, which says …

“My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline and do not resent his rebuke, because the Lord disciplines those he loves, as a father the son he delights in.”

Proper discipline is a proof of love. Chastening can come in the form of guilty feelings, unpleasant circumstances, loss of peace, relationship fractures, or any number of negative consequences for choosing sin. Sometimes, the chastening of the Lord can be physical illness or even death (1 Corinthians 11:30). Often, people ask if God is “punishing” them for wrong choices in the past. All our punishment for sin was exhausted upon Jesus on the cross (Romans 5:9). The wrath of God was poured out on Him so that for those who are “in Christ Jesus” (Romans 8:1) no wrath remains. When we give our lives to Christ, our substitute for sin, our sin is forgiven and God remembers it no more (Hebrews 8:12; 10:15-18). However, often, our wrong choices in the past have brought about unpleasant consequences now. God does not necessarily remove the natural consequences of sin when we repent. Those consequences are tools God can use to teach us, to prevent us from repeating the same mistakes, and to remind us of God’s grace. Examples of chastening are found throughout the Bible. The Israelites were continually disobeying God’s commands (Numbers 14:21-23; Judges 2:1-2; 2 Kings 18:12). He was patient with them, He sent prophets to plead with them, and He warned them many times. But when they dug in their heels and embraced idols or evil practices, God brought chastening upon them in the form of plagues or enemy attacks (Jeremiah 40:3). He still loved them, and in His love He could not allow them to continue in behavior that would destroy them. There are many examples of personal chastening in the Bible, as well, even upon those in whom the Lord most delighted—Moses (Numbers 27:12), David (1 Chronicles 28:3), and Solomon (1 Kings 11:11), to name a few. Notice that, although these men made mistakes and were chastened for them, God did not stop loving or using them. He brought discipline appropriate to the crime, but always forgave the truly repentant heart. God always restored the relationship. When we sin, we can expect that God will not let us get away with it. Because He loves us, He desires us to live holy lives (1 Peter 1:15-16; Romans 8:29). If someone professes to know Christ but is living a lifestyle of unrepentant sin and claims to “feel fine about it,” with no qualms, then that person is not a legitimate child of God (Revelation 3:19; Hebrews 12:5-11; Job 5:17; Psalm 94:12; I John 3:4-12). God “chastises everyone he accepts as a son” (Hebrews 12:6). Bottom line is that your citation of the idea that truly saved, born again Christians receive “punishment” by going to Hell is refuted by the Bible itself.

JOHN ROBEL > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – sorry bro, but you didn’t read this part. Hebrews 10:29 “Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace?” “wherewith he was sanctified” means that this person was saved, only Christians are sanctified. People who have not put their full faith in Christ are not sanctified, potential believers are not sanctified. Spirit-filled Christians are sanctified. Ehem, Ehem, there you have it… “unto the Spirit of Grace” means filled with the Spirit of Grace, meaning that they are a Christian. The sons of Korah who rebelled against Moses died without mercy. They are in hell, bro. Sorer punishment means a worse hell experience for the Christian who continues in willful sin. Reread Heb 10:25-29 I would not teach this eternal security garbage because Jesus will hold you accountable on the day of Judgment. and you don’t want that right? Matthew 12:36 “But I say unto you, That every idle word that men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment.” Also do you believe Mary K Baxter?, watch her “A Pastor in Hell” video on youtube Also Hebrews 6:4-6 4 For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy Ghost, 5 And

BIG PAPA CHERRY BABE
Big and sexy cherries – the kind that beg for attention.  More of these can be seen growing in the John Robel valley in California.

have tasted the good word of God, and the powers of the world to come, 6 If they shall fall away, to renew them again unto repentance; seeing they crucify to themselves the Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame. Partakers of the Holy Ghost is referring to Spirit-filled Christians. It is saying if the Spirit-filled Christian falls away, they are going to hell because God won’t forgive them It makes no sense for it to refer to someone that is on the edge of believing and then decides to leave Christianity alone. They can still come back later (if they are still alive) and become a full Christian. If Spirit-filled Christians fall away, there is nothing new, Christ is not going to die again for their sins. You should also pray and fast for an answer on this subject because if eternal security is wrong, this is a fatal subject to people.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – That is not exactly what is being said in verse 29. Hebrews 10:29 is normally translated as …

“How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has spurned the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace” (Hebrews 10:29)?

But in reality, the “he was sanctified” should instead be translated as “it was sanctified.” Rather than referring to the apostate being sanctified by the blood of Christ or Christ being set apart by his own suffering, it should be translated as “it was sanctified” referring to the sanctification of the new covenant by the blood of Christ. One has no choice but to interpret the passage as such because “the covenant” is the closest referent to the verb “was sanctified.” The context must determine whether “was sanctified” is translated as “he was sanctified” or “it was sanctified.” If that which is sanctified is the new covenant, the meaning of the text is that the shedding of the blood of Christ is the enactment of the new covenant. This fits in with the theology of the book of Hebrews where blood had to be shed for the new covenant to be ratified or come into effect …

“Therefore not even the first covenant was inaugurated without blood” (Hebrews 9:18).

Since the first covenant had to be inaugurated through the blood sacrifices of animals, the new covenant had to be inaugurated through the shedding of Christ’s blood. The language of “holy covenant” in the Bible reflects this truth (Dan 11:30; Luke 1:72). Covenants are holy or set apart because of the sacred purpose of God. Both “holy” and “sanctified” have the same root in Greek. The verb “was sanctified” in Hebrews 10:29 is the verbal form of the word while “holy” is how we translate its adjectival form. The new covenant is a holy covenant because it is unique and distinct from all other covenants. It is not a common covenant, but one enacted by God. And just as the first covenant was set apart from all other covenants by the shedding of blood, the new covenant is set apart and distinguished from all other covenants because of the shedding of Christ’s blood. His suffering alone sanctifies the new covenant and makes it unique in comparison to all other covenants. Hence, profaning the blood of the covenant is an outrageous offense because it was this blood that enacted the new covenant through which salvation comes. But the question must be asked, if this is the correct translation of the verb, then why have not more scholars come to this conclusion? While the International Standard Version agrees with this interpretation, all of the other major Bible translations do not. The reason for this is because of the influence of the history of the translation of the English Bible. While Greek scholars seek to understand the meaning of the New Testament in its original language, the reality is that they often read their pre-existing English translation of the text back into the Greek text. In places where verbs could grammatically refer to either people or objects, we default to the way we were raised to read the English Bible. The bottom line here is that this passage should be translated as it was sanctified” instead of “he was sanctified.” This throws serious and insurmountable doubt on the doctrine of conditional eternal security. Furthermore, your interpretation of Hebrews 10:29 would contradict Jesus’ own statement that he will lose no one in John 6:39. Did the bible contradict itself? If the bible truly is the word of God (which it is), then it will not contradict itself. God makes no mistakes. Yet, with your interpretation of Hebrews 10:29, that is exactly what happens. Not only with John 6:39, but also with Romans 11:29 in which it is stated that the gifts and callings of God are without repentence, meaning irrevocable. That means God is not going to take it back from you.

JOHN ROBEL > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – alright then, well what about Hebrews 6:4-6 Hebrews 6:4-6 4 For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy Ghost, 5 And have tasted the good word of God, and the powers of the world to come, 6 If they shall fall away, to renew them again unto repentance; seeing they crucify to themselves the

Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame. Partakers of the Holy Ghost is referring to Spirit-filled Christians. It is saying if the Spirit-filled Christian falls away, they are going to hell because God won’t forgive them It makes no sense for it to refer to someone that is on the edge of believing and then decides to leave Christianity alone. They can still come back later (if they are still alive) and become a full Christian. If Spirit-filled Christians fall away, there is nothing new, Christ is not going to die again for their sins.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – Hebrews 6:4-6 states …

“For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted the heavenly gift, and have become partakers of the Holy Spirit, and have tasted the good word of God and the powers of the age to come, if they fall away, to renew them again to repentance, since they crucify again for themselves the Son of God, and put Him to an open shame” (Hebrews 6:4-6).

This is one of the Bible’s most difficult passages to interpret, but one thing is clear—it does not teach that we can lose our salvation. There are two valid ways of looking at these verses: One interpretation holds that this passage is written not about Christians but about unbelievers who are convinced of the basic truths of the gospel but who have not placed their faith in Jesus Christ as Savior. They are intellectually persuaded but spiritually uncommitted. According to this interpretation, the phrase “once enlightened” (verse 4) refers to some level of instruction in biblical truth. However, understanding the words of scripture is not the same as being regenerated by the Holy Spirit. For example, John 1:9 describes Jesus, the “true Light,” giving light “to every man”; but this cannot mean the light of salvation, because not every man is saved. Through God’s sovereign power, every man has enough light to be held responsible. This light either leads to the complete acceptance of Jesus Christ or produces condemnation in those who reject such light. The people described in Hebrews 6:4-6 are of the latter group—unbelievers who have been exposed to God’s redemptive truth and perhaps have made a profession of faith, but have not exercised genuine saving faith. This interpretation also sees the phrase “tasted the heavenly gift” (Hebrews 6:9) as referring to a momentary experience, akin to Jesus’ “tasting” death (Hebrews 2:9). This brief experience with the heavenly gift is not seen as equivalent to salvation; rather, it is likened to the second and third soils in Jesus’ parable (Matthew 13:3-23), which describes people who receive the truth of the gospel but are not truly saved. Finally, this interpretation sees the “falling away” (Hebrews 6:6) as a reference to those who have tasted the truth but, not having come all the way to faith, fall away from even the revelation they have been given. The tasting of truth is not enough to keep them from falling away from it. They must come all the way to Christ in complete repentance and faith; otherwise, they in effect re-crucify Christ and treat Him contemptuously. Those who sin against Christ in such a way have no hope of restoration or forgiveness because they reject Him with full knowledge and conscious experience. They have concluded that Jesus should have been crucified, and they stand with His enemies. It is impossible to renew such to repentance. The other interpretation holds that this passage is written about Christians, and that the phrases “partakers of the Holy Ghost,” “enlightened,” and “tasted of the heavenly gift” are all descriptions of true believers. According to this interpretation, the key word in the passage is “if” (verse 6). The writer of Hebrews is setting up a hypothetical statement: “IF” a Christian were to fall away . . .” The point being made is that it would be impossible (IF a Christian falls away) to renew salvation. That’s because Christ died once for sin (Hebrews 9:28), and if His sacrifice is insufficient, then there’s no hope at all. The passage, therefore, presents an argument based on a false premise (that a true Christian can fall away) and follows it to its senseless conclusion (that Jesus would have to be sacrificed again and again). The absurdity of the conclusion points up the impossibility of the original assumption. This reasoning is called reductio ad absurdum, in which a premise is disproved by showing that it logically leads to an absurdity. Both of these interpretations support the security of the believer in Christ. The first interpretation presents unbelievers rejecting Christ and thereby losing their chance of salvation; the second interpretation presents the very idea of believers losing salvation as impossible. Many scriptures make it abundantly clear that salvation is eternal (John 10:27-29; Romans 8:35, 38-39; Philippians 1:6; 1 Peter 1:4-5), and Hebrews 6:4-6 confirms that doctrine.  As far as Mary K. Baxter’s so-called “divine revelation of Hell,” is concerned, it doesn’t even pass the Jesus smell test. There are glaring problems with her testimony it turns out. Given the absurdities and biblical falsehoods in her so-called “hell experience,” one has no choice but to conclude that she either made the story up, or this is a false demonic vision, which the bible warns about when it tells us to “test the spirits.” There are glaring inconsistencies in her story. I highly recommend that you read the critique in the link below.  It’s called “A critique of Mary Baxter’s book A Divine Revelation of Hell.”  It’s very eye-opening.

https://www.near-death.com/science/articles/critique-of-mary-baxters-nde.html

JOHN ROBEL – Matthew 7:21-23 disproves eternal security..these people are people that were christians that did miracles and cast out devils, but they were also committing sins and they did not repent and they went to hell. then on judgment day, Jesus sends them to the lake of fire. eternal security is too dangerous to believe.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – If your interpretation of Matthew 7 is true, then Jesus has contradicted himself when he said in John 6:39 that he will lose no one. Obviously, scripture does not and cannot contradict itself because that would mean that God made a mistake and God does not make mistakes. If the bible truly is divinely inspired, that means it will not contradict itself. Your interpretation of Matthew 7 has Jesus contradicting himself. The two questions most frequently asked about Matthew 7:21-23 come about because the verses seem to contradict two strongly held beliefs—one cannot lose his salvation and anyone who performs miracles must be from God. As we will see, one of these beliefs is based on scriptural truth and the other is not. While the true believer cannot lose his salvation, not all miracles are performed by true believers. Jesus is speaking here near the end of His Sermon on the Mount (chapters 5–7). Beginning in verse 13, Jesus discourses at length on the subject of true faith vs. false professions, using the technique of contrast and comparison. Verses 13-14 describe two paths on which people walk through life, the broad road that leads to eternal destruction and the narrow path that leads to eternal life. He introduces here the concept of the “many” and the “few” that He will return to in verses 21-23. In verses 15-18, He again contrasts the two types of people by using imagery well known to those in an agrarian culture—sheep and wolves, grapes/figs and thorn bushes/thistles, good trees and bad trees, good fruit and bad fruit. Having established the idea of dichotomy in the minds of His hearers, He goes on to apply these truths to the spiritual state of all within His hearing. Jesus presents the two types of people who will come to Him on “that day,” meaning the last day, the day of judgment, the great day fixed by God and unknown to angels and men which will be terrible to some and joyful to others. All will be seeking to enter the kingdom of heaven, but some will be turned away and will react in utter confusion and disappointment as what they thought was their “ticket” to heaven turns out to be worthless. These are those who prophesied in the name of Jesus, meaning either foretelling things to come or preaching the Word in His name. They have even performed miraculous acts such as driving out demons and perhaps healings and other miracles, but all to no avail. But their works were done for their own glory, not His, and were nothing more than “filthy rags” (Isaiah 64:6). In contrast, those who will enter heaven will not do so based on their miraculous achievements and accomplishments or works of any sort, but solely on the basis of obedience to the will of God. But who are these unfortunate people and how can they do miracles unless they are doing them by God’s power? We know several things about them from the text. First, we know there are many of them, because it is many who are on the broad road to eternal death, as compared to the relative few who have found the narrow path to eternal life. Second, they claim the name of Christ. These are not Muslims, Buddhists, or atheists. These are those who would gladly say, “I am a Christian.” They work their works in Jesus’ name. They pray and heal in Jesus’ name. They preach and teach in Jesus’ name. They build huge churches and ministries in Jesus’ name. They claim a relationship with Him. But they are none of His. In fact, He sends them away, not with commendation for their good works in His name (and many good works are done in Jesus’ name by false professors), but by disowning their every deed and word. He “never” knew them, nor did they ever truly know Him. They weren’t Christians who lost their salvation. They were never part of the elect of God, chosen before the foundation of the world (Ephesians 1:4), set apart and sanctified by the Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:11; 2 Timothy 2:21), and justified by faith (Ephesians 2:8-9). The ones Christ puts away from Himself with harsh words of condemnation, calling them doers of evil, never came to Him in faith, despite their outward good works and miracles. Then if these do not belong to God and never did, how do we explain their ability to perform miracles? Can those who do not have the Spirit actually cast out demons and perform miraculous healings and spectacular signs and wonders? There are two possible explanations for the ability of the ungodly to perform such acts. One is that some miracles are done by the power of Satan and his demonic host. They are incredibly powerful beings who can manipulate physical elements to their own ends. Consider the power God allowed Satan to use to afflict Job—lightning, wind (possibly a tornado), and boils all over his body (Job 1:16, 19, 2:7). These are certainly miraculous events. Exodus 7 describes the magicians and sorcerers of Egypt whose “secret arts” impressed many, but clearly these were not men of God. In the New Testament, Paul confronted Elymas the Jewish sorcerer and false prophet, calling him a child of the devil, full of all kinds of deceit and trickery (Acts 13:6-11). So we see that not all miracles come from God and not all who perform miracles in the name of Jesus are truly His. He calls them evildoers because the miracles they perform have evil as their source. In fact, Jesus warned us to be on guard against their deception as the end times draw near (Matthew 24:24). Second, there are times when God, in His sovereign will and for His purposes, will empower unbelievers to perform miraculous deeds. The prime example is Judas who, along with the other disciples, preached the gospel, healed the sick, cast out demons, cleansed lepers, and even raised the dead. There is nothing to indicate that Judas didn’t have the same power as the other eleven, although he was never a true disciple of Christ. He was a deceiver and the “son of perdition” (John 17:12). Yet God gave him the power to do miracles for His own glory and to accomplish His will. We sometimes see this within the Catholic church when priests and the like can cast out demons, but they truly do not put their trust and faith for the salvation of their souls in Christ. They put their trust in Mary as the mediator between Man and Jesus. The regular Catholic folk put their trust in the official human mediator in the Catholic church. I’m not Catholic, but I believe it goes something like that. It’s a deceptive illusion when miracles and good works in the name of Christ whisper in one’s ear that they are truly saved and Heaven bound. “Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved” (Acts 4:12).

JOHN ROBEL > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – The bible is full of general statements. Only some things are absolute. John 6:39 is a general statement. He lost Judas his disciple who was a believer, a follower of Christ, a christian. When Jesus says that he does not lose anyone, it means that the devil cannot take them out of his hands, but the exception is only if the person commits sin. Judas committed the sin of betrayal of Jesus, killed himself and he is in hell now. Judas is not in heaven. He killed himself. that is a sin.

sparkling cherries
Some cherries are big, sparkly and they gleam.  They are the John Robel class of cherries. They beg for picking.

people that die in sin go to hell whether they are christian or not. Remember Ananias and Sapphira from Acts 5:1-11, they lied to Peter and God and God killed them, are they in heaven? yeah right and they were believers in Christ and after that the whole church got scared. Christians can lose salvation. it’s in the bible. You should also watch hell testimonies about christians that went to hell.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – John 6:39 is absolutely not a general statement. Not only is it a statement of eternal security, but a prophecy as well. It is a promise that it will not happen. You cite Judas as an example and make the false assertion that Judas was a true believer. He was not. The following verse of scripture proves he wasn’t a true believer and thus never saved to begin with. Let’s take a look at what Jesus said …

“But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him. And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father. From that time many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with

judas hangs himself
Many make the baffling case that since Judas was one of the twelve that followed Jesus, he was a true believer, and therefore, lost his salvation.  However, Jesus was quite clear in stating that some who followed him did not believe from the very beginning, thus were not saved.  He then states that one of them is a “devil,” or demon.  Jesus was speaking of Judas.  After later betraying Jesus with the thirty pieces of silver, Judas later hung himself and “went to his place” as the Bible puts it.  This “place” Judas went to was Hell.

him. Then said Jesus unto the twelve, Will ye also go away? Then Simon Peter answered him, Lord, to whom shall we go? thou hast the words of eternal life. And we believe and are sure that thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God. Jesus answered them, Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil? He spake of Judas Iscariot the son of Simon: for he it was that should betray him, being one of the twelve” (John 6:64-71).

Notice the very first sentence above (verse 64) – “But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him.” There you have it. Jesus and John both identify Judas as being one who did not believe. Judas was never a true Christian, therefore, he never lost his salvation. But, some believe since he was a disciple and chosen by Jesus, then he had to have been a true believer. However, as you can now plainly see, we find that this is simply not the case. We can see from the very words of John that Christ knew who it was who would betray him, and he associates him with those who did not believe from the beginning. This means that Judas never was a true believer in Christ and therefore, not saved. Of course, we know that he believed Jesus lived since he walked and talked with him. Judas did not believe that Jesus was who he said he was, God in flesh (John 8:24, 58; 10:30-33). He did not affirm the true Messiah-hood of Christ.  Furthermore, we can learn from two things Jesus said that it is not possible to lose one’s salvation …

“And He who sent Me is with Me; He has not left Me alone, for I ALWAYS DO THE THINGS THAT ARE PLEASING TO HIM” (John 8:29). “And THIS IS THE WILL OF HIM WHO SENT ME, THAT OF ALL THAT HE HAS GIVEN ME, I LOSE NOTHING, but raise it up on the last day” (John 6:39).

We can clearly see that Jesus always does the will of the Father (John 8:29). Jesus also said, in John 8:39, that he always does the will of the Father, which is that Jesus lose none, and those who are given to Jesus will be raised (to glory). So, it cannot be that anyone loses his salvation because that would mean Jesus lost someone.  Those who are truly saved cannot lose their salvation. We can conclude that Judas was never saved from what Jesus said in John 6:64-65, as well as other verses about our security in him. Your claim that this is only talking about anyone else including the devil not being able to take them away is reading into the text something that is not there. You are inserting words into the text that aren’t even there in the context of this particular scripture. As far as your citation of Ananias and saphira is concerned, you are also inserting an idea into the text that is not there. Nowhere in that story does it even hint that they were sent to Hell. We can safely assume that they were indeed true born again Christians, but they committed an act that the bible refers to as the “sin unto death.” God can take a believer off the earth through death, but the soul itself still remaines saved. It is an act of chastisement upon the believer from God, not punishment. The bible distinguishes between punishment that is reserved for the unsaved and chastisement, which is reserved for believers. Were Ananias and Sapphira saved? We can believe they probably were. Their story is told in the context of the actions of “all the believers” (Acts 4:32). They knew of the Holy Spirit (Acts 5:3), and Ananias’s lie could have been an earlier promise that he would give the whole amount of the sale to the Lord. But the best evidence that they were children of God may be that they received discipline: “If you are not disciplined—and everyone undergoes discipline—then you are not legitimate, not true sons and daughters at all” (Hebrews 12:8; see also 1 Corinthians 5:12). Ananias and his wife had conspired to garner the accolades of the church; but their conspiracy led to the sin unto death, not the loss of salvation. Sorry, but the weight of evidence is against you. You have clearly failed to prove any point that a believer can lose salvation. As far as watching Hell testimonies of Christians going to Hell, I’ve seen so many of those that my computer is still smoking. Here’s the thing with those testimonies, some people make it up for a good and, in their mind, acceptable reason, which is to lead people to Christ whether the experience is true or not. Some are likely demonic deceptions. A good many of them contradict scripture. Scripture warns of the deceptive nature of demons. People will believe a “supernatural” experience over scripture any day of the week. The bible admonishes believers to “test the spirits.” Beware.

JOHN ROBEL – I think we should consider the fact that we can lose our salvation, otherwise Paul warnings for the christian church would have been for nothing. It’s safer

glacier cherries
Some cherries are more prone to picking than others.  They are aptly called “glacier cherries.”  In particular, these cherries can also be seen growing in the John Robel valley in California.

to believe that you can lose your salvation because you would be encouraged to live right constantly and consistently for the Lord. If a christian sins and dies before repenting, the Lord will send them to hell. Matthew 24:13 But the one who perseveres to the end will be saved. If you don’t fight against sin, and sin whenever you want and die without repenting, you are going to hell whether you are christian or not. there are testimonies on youtube that support this. you want to risk eternal life by believing eternal security garbage, be my guest.. you only have eternal security if you become saved and never sin again or if you died and went to heaven.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JOHN ROBEL – You’ve taken Matthew 24:13 out of context. This portion of scripture is speaking of the approaching seven year Tribulation period of judgment upon earth. Those who remain on earth in the tribulation period after the rapture of true born again believers will have to endure to the end to be delivered. This isn’t talking about a true saved born again believer having to endure in order to keep his or her salvation. In Matthew 24:13 Jesus says … “He that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved” (KJV), or, as the NIV has it, “The one who stands firm to the end will be saved.” This verse is part of Jesus’ Olivet Discourse, an explanation to His disciples about things to come. Jesus told the Twelve that the temple would be destroyed (Matthew 24:2), and, in response, they asked Him, “When will this happen, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?” (verse 3). Their question had two parts and so required two answers. Jesus combined those answers into one long discourse about what was ahead before He returned. Some of those prophecies were fulfilled with the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. The remainder has yet to happen. This specific verse is best understood when read in context. Verses Matthew 24:9–14 says …

“Then you will be handed over to be persecuted and put to death, and you will be hated by all nations because of me. At that time many will turn away from the faith and will betray and hate each other, and many false prophets will appear and deceive many people. Because of the increase of wickedness, the love of most will grow cold, but the one who stands firm to the end will be saved. And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come” (Matthew 24:9-14).

If your interpretation of Matthew 24:13 were correct, that means there is a possibility of someone losing their salvation, something that Jesus clearly said would not happen when he said in John 6:39 that he would lose no one. Your interpretation would have Jesus contradicting himself.

SHARPER110 – ( APOSTASY ) A CHRISTIAN CAN LOSE THEIR SALVATION AND BE LOST ETERNALLY There are over forty scriptures in the New Testament which show severe consequences for Christians who become unfaithful.Because Baptists teach that a Christian cannot lose their salvation, you will never hear a Baptist preacher read the following passage of scripture publicly. HEBREWS 3:12 Take care, brethren, that there not be in any one of you an evil, unbelieving heart that falls away from the living God. 13 But encourage one another day after day, as long as it is still called “Today,” so that none of you will be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin. 14 For we have become partakers of Christ,if we hold fast the beginning of our assurance firm until the end, Don’t you think it

sexy cherries
The sexier the cherry, the uglier the fall.

is time for you Baptists to stand up to your preachers and say ” NO MORE ” false teachings. Quit trying to deceive people by substituting the word ” works ” for obedience. Obedience to Jesus and His teachings is a requirement if you want to go to Heaven. Heb 5:8-9, John 8:31-32, John 14:23, II John 1:9-11. Matt 28:18-20, etc. There is a difference between a Christian committing a sin and practicing a sin. Today I heard a Baptist preacher quote I John 1:7-9 and leave out the first word ( IF ) which changes the whole meaning of the passage. Wake up Baptists before it is too late.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > SHARPER110 – You’ve taken Hebrews 3:12-14 out of context, as most people do. If it means what you think it means, then we have a contradiction in the Bible as Jesus said in John 6:39 that he will lose no one. It would also contradict Romans 11:29 wherein it is stated that the gifts and callings of God are without repentance, which means that God is not going to take it back. So, here is where it’s important to understand the true context of Hebrews 3. It turns out, there is a very good and solid explanation for what you are reading in Hebrews 3, and it does not teach that a true believer can lose salvation. The concept of entering into God’s rest comes from Hebrews 3—4. What is this “rest” the Hebrew writer is talking about? How do we enter it? And how do we fail to enter it? The writer to the Hebrews begins his discussion of God’s rest in chapter 3, where he references the Israelites wandering in the desert. In giving them the land of Canaan, God had promised them that He would go before them and defeat all their enemies in order that they could live securely (Deuteronomy 12:9–10). All that was required of them was to fully trust in Him and His promises. However, they refused to obey Him. Instead, they murmured against Him, even yearning to go back to their bondage under the Egyptians (Exodus 16:3; 17:1–7; Numbers 20:3–13). The particular “rest” referred to here was that of the land of Canaan. Into that rest God solemnly said the Israelites who disobeyed Him would never enter (Hebrews 3:11). They had been rebellious. All the means of reclaiming them had failed. God had warned and entreated them; He had caused His mercies to pass before them, and had visited them with judgments in vain; and He now declares that for all their rebellion they should be excluded from the Promised Land (Hebrews 3:16–19). But, eventually, the next generation did place their faith in God and, by following the leadership of Joshua, they, some forty years later, entered into God’s rest, the land of Canaan (Joshua 3:14–17). Using the Israelites as an example of those who were not resting in God’s promises, the writer of Hebrews goes on in chapter 4 to make the application personal, both to the Hebrew Christians and to us:

“Therefore, since the promise of entering his rest still stands, let us be careful that none of you be found to have fallen short of it” (Hebrews 4:1).

The promise that still stands is the promise of salvation through God’s provision—Jesus Christ. He alone can provide the eternal rest of salvation through His blood shed on the cross for the remission of sins. God’s rest, then, is in the spiritual realm, the rest of salvation. Faith, the author goes on to assert, is the key to entering God’s rest. The Hebrews had had the gospel preached to them, just as the Israelites knew the truth about God, but the messages were of “no value to them, because those who heard did not combine it with faith” (Hebrews 4:2). Some had heard the good news of Christ, but they rejected it for lack of faith. Hebrews 4:10–13 explains the nature of this faith. The kind of faith that enables us to enter into God’s rest is a faith that first demands that we rest from relying on our own works. Then the writer seemingly contradicts himself by telling us to make every effort …

“For anyone who enters God’s rest also rests from his own work, just as God did from his. Let us, therefore, make every effort to enter that rest, so that no one will fall by following their example of disobedience” (Hebrews 4:10–11).

What this apparent paradox means is that such biblical faith involves our submissiveness to God, and our efforts in that area. Though we desist in our self-efforts to earn salvation and the promised eternal rest, we also “make every effort to enter that rest” by choosing to depend solely on God, to trust Him implicitly, to yield totally to the promises of God through the free grace of His salvation. Why? So “that no one will fall by following their [the Israelites’] example of disobedience” (Hebrews 4:11). We either trust ourselves to save ourselves, or we trust God to do that for us through the sacrifice of Christ on the cross. By failing to trust God fully in His promises, we become disobedient and fail to enter the rest that is eternal life, just as the children of Israel became disobedient when they failed to enter the Promised Land. So how do we stop trusting ourselves? How do we place our full trust in God and His promises? We enter into God’s rest by first understanding our total inability to enter God’s rest on our own. Next, we enter God’s rest by our total faith in the sacrifice of Christ and complete obedience to God and His will …

“And to whom did God swear that they would never enter his rest if not to those who disobeyed? So we see that they were not able to enter, because of their unbelief” (Hebrews 3:18–19).

Unlike the Israelites whose unbelief prevented them from entering the Promised Land, we are to enter God’s rest by faith in Him, faith which is a gift from Him by grace (Ephesians 2:8–9). The Bible speaks of the “sin unto death” in which a believer’s life can be taken so that salvation of the soul is not lost. I remember reading a very good article about this passage of scripture and it very well explains everything. It does not teach that salvation can be lost. The link is below.  It’s called “RESISTING A REST.”

https://bible.org/seriespage/8-resisting-rest-hebrews-37-19

You’re also taking John 8:31-32 out of context. This isn’t talking about the danger of a truly saved Christian losing salvation. The following article in the link below gives a nice context of this one. A lengthy read, but it suffices.

https://bible.org/seriespage/20-father-son-john-831-59

You’ve also read into John 14:23 something that just isn’t there. This also is not talking about the possibility of salvation being lost. The Bible has much to say about obedience. In fact, obedience is an essential part of the Christian faith. Jesus Himself was “obedient unto death, even death on a cross” (Philippians 2:8). For Christians, the act of taking up our cross and following Christ (Matthew 16:24) means obedience. The Bible says that we show our love for Jesus by obeying Him in all things: “If you love Me, keep My commandments” (John 14:15). A Christian who is not obeying Christ’s commands can rightly be asked, “Why do you call me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ and do not do what I say?” (Luke 6:46). Obedience is defined as “dutiful or submissive compliance to the commands of one in authority.” Using this definition, we see the elements of biblical obedience. “Dutiful” means it is our obligation to obey God, just as Jesus fulfilled His duty to the Father by dying on the cross for our sin. “Submissive” indicates that we yield our wills to God’s. “Commands” speaks of the Scriptures in which God has clearly delineated His instructions. The “one in authority” is God Himself, whose authority is total and unequivocal. For the Christian, obedience means complying with everything God has commanded. It is our duty to do so. Having said that, it is important to remember that our obedience to God is not solely a matter of duty. We obey Him because we love Him (John 14:23). Also, we understand that the spirit of obedience is as important as the act of obedience. We serve the Lord in humility, singleness of heart, and love. Living the Christian life is not all about rules. The Pharisees in Jesus’ time relentlessly pursued acts of obedience to the Law, but they became self-righteous, believing they deserved heaven because of what they had done. They considered themselves worthy before God, who owed them a reward; however, the Bible tells us that, without Christ, even our best, most righteous works are as “filthy rags” (Isaiah 64:6). The Pharisees’ external obedience still lacked something, and Jesus exposed their heart attitude. Their hypocrisy in obeying the “letter of the law” while violating its spirit characterized their lives, and Jesus rebuked them sharply …

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which indeed appear beautiful outside, but inside they are full of dead men’s bones, and of all uncleanness. Even so you also appear righteous to men outwardly, but inside you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity” (Matthew 23:27–28).

The Pharisees were obedient in some respects, but they “neglected the weightier matters of the law” (Matthew 23:23, ESV). Today, we are not called to obey the Law of Moses. That has been fulfilled in Christ (Matthew 5:17). We are to obey the “law of Christ,” which is a law of love (Galatians 6:2; John 13:34). Jesus stated the greatest commands of all: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself. All the Law and the prophets hang on these two commandments” (Matthew 22:36–40). These two commandments are fulfilled by being “in Christ,” or saved. These are the natural outgrowths of being saved. It is not an “act of works” he is speaking about here. If we love God, we will obey Him. We won’t be perfect in our obedience, but our desire is to submit to the Lord and display good works. When we love God and obey Him, we naturally have love for one another. Obedience to God’s commands will make us light and salt in a dark and tasteless world (Matthew 5:13–16). But the issue is being salt and light, not keeping salvation in fear of losing it. Jesus is saying no such thing as losing salvation. If he was, he contradicted himself by saying in John 6:39 that he will lose no one …

“And this is the Father’s will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day” (John 6:39).

You’ve also taken 2 John 1:9-11 out of context …

“Whosoever transgresseth, and abideth not in the doctrine of Christ, hath not God. He that abideth in the doctrine of Christ, he hath both the Father and the Son. If there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speed: For he that biddeth him God speed is partaker of his evil deeds” (2 John 1:9-11).

The doctrine of “abiding in Christ” is the doctrine of salvation through faith in him, not works to maintain and keep your salvation. Christ emphatically stated what his doctrine is, it all hinges upon belief in him and personally trusting on him for salvation. To “abide” is to live, continue, or remain; so, to abide in Christ is to live in Him or remain in Him. When a person is saved, he or she is described as being “in Christ” (Romans 8:1; 2 Corinthians 5:17), held secure in a permanent relationship (John 10:28–29). Therefore, abiding in Christ is not a special level of Christian experience, available only to a few; rather, it is the position of all true believers. The difference between those abiding in Christ and those not abiding in Christ is the difference between the saved and the unsaved. Abiding in Christ is taught in 1 John 2:5–6, where it is synonymous with “knowing” Christ (verses 2 and 3). Later in the same chapter, John equates “remaining” in the Father and the Son with having the promise of eternal life (verses 24 and 25). Biblically, “abiding in,” “remaining in,” and “knowing” Christ are references to the same thing: salvation. The phrase abiding in Christ pictures an intimate, close relationship, and not just a superficial acquaintance. In John 15:4–7, Jesus tells His disciples that drawing life from Him is essential, using the picture of branches united to a vine …

“Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself unless it abides in the vine, so neither can you unless you abide in Me. I am the vine, you are the branches; he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing. If anyone does not abide in Me, he is thrown away as a branch and dries up; and they gather them, and cast them into the fire and they are burned. If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you” (John 15:4-7).

Without that vital union with Christ that salvation provides, there can be no life and no productivity. Elsewhere, the Bible likens our relationship with Christ to that of a body with a head (Colossians 1:18)—another essential union. Some people take the warning of John 15:6 (branches that do not abide in the vine are thrown away and burned) to mean that Christians are always in danger of losing their salvation. In other words, they say it’s possible to be saved but not “abide,” in which case we would be cast away. But this could only be true if “abiding” were separate from salvation, referring to a state of intimacy with Christ we must strive to attain post-salvation. The Bible is clear that salvation comes by grace and is maintained by grace (Galatians 3:2–3). Also, if a branch could somehow fall away from the vine, resulting in the loss of salvation, then other, very clear passages of Scripture would be contradicted (see John 10:27–30). It is best to interpret the True Vine metaphor this way: Jesus is the True Vine, obviously. The branches who “abide” in Him are the truly saved—they have a real and vital connection to the Savior. The withered branches who do not “abide” in Him are the unsaved pretenders who feigned an attachment to the Vine but drew no life from Him. In the end, the pretenders will be seen for what they were: hangers-on who had no authentic attachment to Jesus. For a while, both Peter and Judas seemed identical in their walk with Christ. But Peter was attached to the Vine and Judas was not. John restates the withered-branch principle this way …

“They [people now opposed to Christ] went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us” (1 John 2:19).

One of the proofs of salvation is perseverance, or sustained abiding in Christ. The saved will continue in their walk with Christ (see Revelation 2:26). That is, they will “abide” or remain in Him. God will complete His work in them (Philippians 1:6), and they will bring forth much fruit to the glory of God (John 15:5). Those who fall away, turn their backs on Christ, or fail to abide simply show their lack of saving faith. Abiding is not what saves us, but it is one of the signs of salvation, but not the means of salvation and keeping it.

And you’ve also taken Matthew 28:18-20 out of context. This is not talking about a believer losing salvation. Matthew 28:19-20 contains what has come to be called the Great Commission …

“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20).

Jesus gave this command to the apostles shortly before He ascended into heaven, and it essentially outlines what Jesus expected the apostles, and those who followed them, to do in His absence. It is interesting that in the original Greek, the only specific command in Matthew 28:19-20 is “make disciples.” The Great Commission instructs us to make disciples while we are going throughout the world and while we are going about our daily activities. How are we to make disciples? By baptizing them and teaching them all that Jesus commanded. “Make disciples” is the command of the Great Commission. “As you are going,” “baptizing,” and “teaching” are the means by which we fulfill the command to “make disciples.” This has nothing to do with a saved believer losing salvation.

KINGJR DIAZ – Can you lose your salvation? Yes, you can lose your salvation if you are sinning willfully and not repenting.That means you are abusing and misusing God’s imagesgrace. You are insulting the Spirit of grace(Heb. 10: 26-29, Matt. 12:31) Grace forgives you so you could keep the Divine Laws again (Jn. 8:11, Matt. 5:17-19)not the ceremonial, ritual or sacrificial laws (we are longer under these laws). We are saved as long as we are not losing our faith (Heb. 10:39, Matt. 10:22, Rev. 2:10b).

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > KINGJR DIAZ – Your interpretation isn’t adding up. A truly saved, born again believer who is sinning willfully will result in chastisement from God, not punishment that results in eternal damnation for the unsaved, non believer. The bible distinguishes between chastisement for the willfully sinning believer and punishment for the non believer. “Willful sinning” in Hebrews 10:26-29 carries the idea of consciously and deliberately rejecting Christ. To know God’s way, to hear it preached, to study it, to count oneself among the faithful, and then to turn away is to become apostate. Sinning willfully carries with it the idea of sinning continually and deliberately. Such a person does not sin because of ignorance, nor is he carried away by momentary temptations he is too weak to resist. The willful sinner sins because of an established way of thinking and acting which he has no desire to give up. The true believer, on the other hand, is one who lapses into sin and loses temporary fellowship with God, not relationship. But he will eventually come back to God in repentance because God will continually woo and convict him until he can’t stay away any longer. But it must be kept in mind that while he is out of fellowship before he comes back, he has not lost his or her salvation. He has lost fellowship. Apostates have knowledge, but no application of that knowledge. They can be found in the presence of the light of Christ, mostly in the church, among God’s people. Judas Iscariot is the perfect example—he had knowledge but he lacked true faith. No other rejector of the truth had more or better exposure to the love and grace of God than Judas. He was part of Jesus’ inner circle of disciples, eating, sleeping, and traveling with Him for years. He saw the miracles and heard the words of God from Jesus’ very lips, from the best preacher the world has ever known, and yet he not only turned away but was instrumental in the plot to kill Jesus. Having turned his back on the truth, and with full knowledge choosing to willfully and continually sin, the apostate is then beyond salvation because he has rejected the one true sacrifice for sins: the Lord Jesus Christ. If Christ’s sacrifice is rejected, then all hope of salvation is gone. To turn away willfully from this sacrifice leaves no sacrifice; it leaves only sin, the penalty for which is eternal death. This passage is not speaking of a believer who falls away, but rather someone who may claim to be a believer, but truly is not. Anyone who apostatizes is proving he never had genuine faith to begin with (1 John 2:19). You also cite Matthew 12:31

“Wherefore I say unto you, all manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven men; but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven men”. And whosoever speaks a word against the Son of Man, it shall be forgiven him; but whosoever speaks against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come”(Matthew 12:31).

What is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? Hint, it’s not a verbally spoken curse word. It is the rejection of Christ in unbelief. The reason is because you have rejected the only means of your salvation, which the Holy Ghost was the one responsible for you knowing him in the first place. It’s the Holy Ghost that draws one to Christ to begin with. So, to reject Christ, you’ve rejected the Holy Ghost and thus you have committed blasphemy against him. Christ himself makes it clear that it’s the Spirit (Holy Ghost) that is responsible for one being drawn to Christ in the first place. Scripture bears this out. So, bottom line, the only sin that cannot and will not be forgiven is the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit … a person who rejects Christ a.k.a. the unsaved person. It’s impossible for a believer to “blaspheme” the Holy Ghost when the seed of the Holy Ghost is residing on the inside of a believer according to 1 John 3.  The concept of “blasphemy against the Spirit” is mentioned in Mark 3:22–30 and Matthew 12:22–32. Jesus has just performed a miracle. A demon-possessed man was brought to Jesus, and the Lord cast the demon out, healing the man of blindness and muteness. The eyewitnesses to this exorcism began to wonder if Jesus was indeed the Messiah they had been waiting for. A group of Pharisees, hearing the talk of the Messiah, quickly quashed any budding faith in the crowd: “It is only by Beelzebul, the prince of demons, that this fellow drives out demons,” they said (Matthew 12:24). Jesus rebuts the Pharisees with some logical arguments for why He is not casting out demons in the power of Satan (Matthew 12:25–29). Then He speaks of the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit …

“I tell you, every kind of sin and slander can be forgiven, but blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come” (verses 31–32).

The term blasphemy may be generally defined as “defiant irreverence.” The term can be applied to such sins as cursing God or willfully degrading things relating to God. Blasphemy is also attributing some evil to God or denying Him some good that we should attribute to Him. This particular case of blasphemy, however, is called “the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit” in Matthew 12:31. The Pharisees, having witnessed irrefutable proof that Jesus was working miracles in the power of the Holy Spirit, claimed instead that the Lord was possessed by a demon (Matthew 12:24). Notice in Mark 3:30 Jesus is very specific about what the Pharisees did to commit blasphemy against the Holy Spirit: “He said this because they were saying, ‘He has an impure spirit.’” Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit has to do with accusing Jesus Christ of being demon-possessed instead of Spirit-filled. This particular type of blasphemy cannot be duplicated today. The Pharisees were in a unique moment in history: they had the Law and the Prophets, they had the Holy Spirit stirring their hearts, they had the Son of God Himself standing right in front of them, and they saw with their own eyes the miracles He did. Never before in the history of the world (and never since) had so much divine light been granted to men; if anyone should have recognized Jesus for who He was, it was the Pharisees. Yet they chose defiance. They purposely attributed the work of the Spirit to the devil, even though they knew the truth and had the proof. Jesus declared their willful blindness to be unpardonable. Their blasphemy against the Holy Spirit was their final rejection of God’s grace. They had set their course, and God was going to let them sail into perdition unhindered. Jesus told the crowd that the Pharisees’ blasphemy against the Holy Spirit “will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come” (Matthew 12:32). This is another way of saying that their sin would never be forgiven, ever. Not now, not in eternity. As Mark 3:29 puts it, “They are guilty of an eternal sin.” The immediate result of the Pharisees’ public rejection of Christ (and God’s rejection of them) is seen in the next chapter. Jesus, for the first time, “told them many things in parables” (Matthew 13:3; cf. Mark 4:2). The disciples were puzzled at Jesus’ change of teaching method, and Jesus explained His use of parables …

“Because the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them. . . . Though seeing, they do not see; though hearing, they do not hear or understand” (Matthew 13:11, 13).

Jesus began to veil the truth with parables and metaphors as a direct result of the Jewish leaders’ official denunciation of Him. Again, the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit cannot be repeated today, although some people try. Jesus Christ is not on earth—He is seated at the right hand of God. No one can personally witness Jesus performing a miracle and then attribute that power to Satan instead of the Spirit. The unpardonable sin today is the state of continued unbelief. The Spirit currently convicts the unsaved world of sin, righteousness, and judgment (John 16:8). To resist that conviction and willfully remain unrepentant is to “blaspheme” the Spirit. There is no pardon, either in this age or in the age to come, for a person who rejects the Spirit’s promptings to trust in Jesus Christ and then dies in unbelief. The love of God is evident …

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16).

And the choice is clear …

“Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on him” (John 3:36).

You also cite John 8:11 … Nowhere is the threat of eternal damnation in view here. Jesus is simply saying a worse thing could come upon her if she continues in that lifestye choice. There are two instances in the New Testament when Jesus told someone to “sin no more,” and they were each under very different circumstances. The first is when Jesus healed an invalid by the Pool of Bethesda (John 5:1–15). Afterward, Jesus found the man and told him, “See, you are well again. Stop sinning or something worse may happen to you” (verse 14). It is clear that Jesus knew what had caused the man’s condition. We are not told the specifics of the man’s physical impairment, but the context implies that it was caused by sinful choices. Jesus warned the man that he had been given a second chance and that he should make better choices. If the man returned to his sinful behavior, he would have wasted the opportunity Jesus gave him to live whole and forgiven. The second instance is in the account of the woman taken in the act of adultery (John 8:3–11). When the woman’s accusers brought her before Jesus, expecting Him to pronounce judgment, He told them that the one who was without sin should throw the first stone. One by one, the condemning crowd left. Then Jesus told the woman, “Neither do I condemn you. Go and sin no more” (verse 11). She had been caught. She was guilty. She did deserve stoning according to the Law of Moses (Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:22). But the religious leaders who had dragged her there had no concern for holiness. They were trying to trap Jesus into saying that the Law did not matter (verse 6). Jesus often reminded those religious leaders that He had not come to abolish the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17). He, as God, was the Author of the Law (2 Timothy 3:16). The Pharisees focused on the letter of the Law but missed the true spirit of it, which is given in Galatians 5:14: “The whole law can be summed up in this one command: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” When Jesus refused to condemn the woman, He was not minimizing the importance of holiness. He was offering her the same kind of forgiveness He offers every one of us (Acts 3:19). In saying, “Go and sin no more,” Jesus was not speaking of sinless perfection. He was warning against a return to sinful lifestyle choices. His words both extended mercy and demanded holiness. Jesus was always the perfect balance of “grace and truth” (John 1:14). With forgiveness comes the expectation that we will not continue in the same path of rebelliousness. Those who know God’s love will naturally want to obey Him (John 14:15). When we turn to Christ and receive His forgiveness, we experience a heart change (Luke 9:23; Acts 1:8). Forgiveness is not cheap, and it does not excuse the sin that separated us from God. It cost God everything to offer us the cleansing that pronounces us righteous before Him (John 3:16; 15:13). Rather than continue in the self-centered path that led us astray from Him to begin with, the forgiven can walk in God’s path (Luke 14:27). A move toward God is a move toward righteousness, purity, and holy living (1 Peter 1:16; Romans 8:29). We cannot experience the transforming power of forgiveness without being forever changed. It goes without saying that the woman caught in adultery did not return to her infidelity. She had met Jesus. She would not be perfect. No one is. But she was forever changed. Her eyes had been opened to the depravity of what she was doing. Sin no longer held the appeal it once did. When we meet Jesus, sin no longer holds its fatal attraction. Grace changes things …

“Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means! We are those who have died to sin; how can we live in it any longer?” (Romans 6:1–2).

When we are born again (John 3:3), the power of the Holy Spirit breaks the power that sin once had over us (Romans 6:6). Once we lived only to please ourselves, but when we have been forgiven, our motivation changes. We now live to please God (Galatians 2:20). It should be the goal of every Christian to “sin no more,” although we recognize that, while we are in the flesh, we will still stumble (1 John 1:8). God’s desire for each of us is to be holy as He is holy (1 Peter 1:16). We still sin, but sin is no longer a lifestyle choice (1 John 3:9–10). When we fail, we can come to God and ask forgiveness (1 John 1:9; 1 Peter 4:1–2). And if we are truly God’s children, He will correct us, disciplining us when we need it (Hebrews 12:6–11). His work is to conform us to the image of His Son (Romans 8:29). The bottom line is that John 8:11 is not warning of eternal damnation for a saved, born again believer, rather it is the idea of consequences in life and chastisement from God.

You also cite Hebrews 10:39 … This is another scripture that is often taken out of context to present the idea that a saved believer can lose his or her salvation. When one cherry picks scripture without reading the verses preceding and following said cherry picked scripture, one will misunderstand the context of what is being said. In this instance, the preceding verse makes it clear that a saved, born again believer is secure in their salvation. When one “draws back” from the faith that saves a person’s soul, said person never got saved to begin with. 1 John 2:19 perfectly reveals this to be the case …

“They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would no doubt have continued with us: but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us” (1 John 2:19).

Some only have a head knowledge of Christ, but do not truly believe and accept him in their hearts as their savior. This is what is being said in Hebrews 10:39. It is not talking about a believer “drawing back” from faith. Further, Hebrews 10:39 makes the declaration that we (saved believers) are ” not of them who draw back into perdition” (eternal damnation), but are of them who believe to the saving of the soul. Verse 39 makes it abundantly clear. The entire context of this scripture is contrasting the saved with the unsaved. This is not speaking about the loss of salvation for a genuine saved, born again believer. The one doing the drawing back in this scripture is an unsaved person who comes to the knowledge of salvation, but then doesn’t complete the transaction and rejects Christ. Or said another way as verse 38 puts it, they draw back. But we, on the other hand (saved believers) are “not of them who draw back.” Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him. But we are not of them who draw back unto perdition; but of them that believe to the saving of the soul. So, another conditional security argument bites the dust. You also cite Matthew 10:22

“And ye shall be hated of all men for my name’s sake: but he that endureth to the end shall be saved” (Matthew 10:22).

Matthew 10:22 is not talking about enduring to the end so that one’s soul will be saved. The word “saved” must always be understood in its context. Saved from what and by what means? “Saved” is the Greek sozo which may refer to any kind of deliverance and should often be simply translated “delivered.” It can refer to physical deliverance or to some kind of spiritual deliverance, but the context is the determining factor. In point of fact, this passage is speaking about physical deliverance or the survival of those who last through the judgments of the tribulation. Those who are believers and who survive until the end of that period of time will be saved, that is, delivered (Matt. 24:13). This does not refer to a personal self-effort at endurance that results in one’s eternal salvation, but to physical deliverance of those who trust in the Savior during the Tribulation. The endurance, then, is physical survival. While many will be martyred, a few will make to the end. Those who endure through the awful events of the Tribulation will be alive or delivered by Christ when he returns to earth. This is not a reference to eternal salvation from sin, but rather the deliverance of survivors at the end of the Tribulation as stated in Romans 11:26 where the Deliver will save the nation Israel from its persecutors. Many will not endure to the end in that they will be martyred for their faith as described in Revelation 7:9-17. Bottom line … Matthew 10:22 is not talking about a believer not enduring and possibly losing salvation. Another conditional security argument bites the dust.

You also cite Revelation 2:10, which you are also taking out of context. Smyrna was a large, important city on the western coast of Asia Minor, famed for its schools of medicine and science. The words of Jesus to the church in Smyrna in Revelation 2:8-11 offer insight into the life of a first-century congregation, and there are many applications for today’s believers. The message was from the Lord Jesus Christ: “These are the words of him who is the First and the Last, who died and came to life again” (Revelation 2:8). The identity of the first and the last and the resurrected one could only be Jesus Christ (see Revelation 22:13). Jesus starts by acknowledging their trials …

“I know your afflictions and your poverty—yet you are rich! I know the slander of those who say they are Jews and are not, but are a synagogue of Satan” (Revelation 2:9).

In their physical poverty, however, the church of Smyrna was “rich”; that is, they had spiritual wealth that no one could take away (Matthew 6:20). As for the identity of the “synagogue of Satan,” there are a couple of views. One is that this was a group of Gentiles who called themselves “Jews” (i.e., the chosen people of God). Instead of following Judaism, however, these self-proclaimed “people of God” worshiped the Roman emperor and spoke out against the Christians in Smyrna. Another view is that the “synagogue of Satan” was a group of physical Jews who followed tradition and the Mosaic Law yet in reality did not know God. They were “not” Jews in the sense that they did not have the faith of their father Abraham (Luke 3:8; John 8:40), and they were “of Satan” in that they had rejected Jesus Christ (John 8:44). Jesus dealt with many such religious leaders, as did the apostle Paul (Matthew 23; Acts 18:6). In fact, Paul differentiates “true” (spiritual) Jews from those who can only claim a physical connection to Abraham …

“A man is not a Jew if he is only one outwardly, nor is circumcision merely outward and physical. No, a man is a Jew if he is one inwardly; and circumcision is circumcision of the heart, by the Spirit, not by the written code” (Romans 2:28-29).

Adding weight to the latter view is the fact that Polycarp was martyred in Smyrna around A.D. 155. At Polycarp’s trial, the unbelieving Jews of Smyrna joined with the pagans in condemning him to death. Eusebius writes that “the Jews, being especially zealous . . . ran to procure fuel” for the burning (The Ecclesiastical History 4:15). After commending the church in Smyrna for their spiritual victories, Jesus warned of coming persecution …

“You are about to suffer. I tell you, the devil will put some of you in prison to test you, and you will suffer persecution for ten days” (Revelation 2:10).

Some of the church members would be imprisoned, and this wave of persecution would last for ten days. However, Jesus gives hope to His church: “Do not be afraid,” He says. The Smyrnan believers would have the courage to face the trial (Matthew 5:11-12). Jesus calls them to remain faithful in their suffering: “Be faithful, even to the point of death, and I will give you the crown of life” (Revelation 2:10). Here, a specific crown is mentioned for those who die as a result of suffering for Christ. This same “martyr’s crown” is also mentioned in James 1:12 …

“Blessed is the man who perseveres under trial, because when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love him” (James 1:12).

Jesus makes a final promise to the believers in Smyrna …

“He who overcomes will not be hurt at all by the second death” (Revelation 2:11).

The overcomers, or “conquerors,” refer to all believers (1 John 5:4-5). The second death is a reference to the final judgment of the wicked (the unsaved, Revelation 20:6, 14; 21:8). Biblically speaking, a Christian does not fall into the category of “the wicked.” Believers will not be hurt “at all” by that judgment; their sin was judged at the cross, and, in Christ, there is no more condemnation (Romans 8:1). Another conditional security argument bites the dust.

ADAM – serpent saying: Genesis 3:4 “And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die” God saying: Ezekiel 18:4 “the soul that sinneth, it shall die.” Dr. Stanley, which message are you preaching?

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > ADAM – You’re taking Genesis 3:4 way out of context and applying it to the concept that a Christian can lose his or her salvation. When Eve was told by the serpent that she will not surely die was a lie of course (both Adam and Eve did die spiritually), but then God made coats of Animal skins to cover them. Their spirits died, but then their spirits were made alive again when God made coats for them from animal skins. Physically, they and the creation remained in a state of death although their spirits were made alive again. The animal skins from God was a picture of the future sacrifice of Christ that would cover men’s sins. You are applying this to mean a Christian “goes to hell” when they sin. Sorry dude, that one just doesn’t work. Ezekiel 18:4

ADAM AND EVE EXPULSION
After the fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, they both sewed fig leaves together to hide their nakedness.  This is a picture of man’s attempt to cover himself for the forgiveness of sins and cover his nakedness … “And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons” (Genesis 3:7).  But later, God himself covers them with his own method through providing “coats of skins.” This is a picture that speaks to us that only God can provide the means in which our sins are covered, not through our own self-righteous works …  “Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them” (Genesis 3:21).  

is also taken out of context. This is speaking of something else, not the eternal security of a believer. This hearkens back to Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. When a person’s spirit is regenerated back to life from it’s state of death by receiving Jesus Christ through faith, said person is no longer in a state of sin, or state of death. Said another way, the soul no longer “sinneth” as it were. This is made clear in 1 John 3:9 when it’s stated that a person’s soul or spirit cannot sin because he is born of God because the seed of the Holy spirit remains in him. Any sin a believer commits is committed in the flesh, not the regenerated spirit. Below is the scripture that makes this clear …

“Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God” (1 John 3:9).

This is why one has to employ the method of Isaiah 28:10 to accurately get a correct interpretation of scripture, otherwise, scripture is going to end up contradicting itself somewhere when people fail to employ this method …

“For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little” (Isaiah 28:10).

You’re interpretation of Ezekiel 18:4 would contradict Jesus’ own statement that he will lose no one in John 6:39.

BILL ERICKSON – the loss is not rewards but eternal life itself for disobedience,lukewarmness. the only place where a loss of rewards is when your MOTIVE for your GOOD works are for human praise(giving to poor to be seen,praying to be seen,fasting to be seen and what he was talking about i. corinthians about your labors to grow the church that was done in vain. eternal life is NOT IN IS,IS NOT OUR POSSESION.eternal life is IN CHRIST(rom.6:23,1 john 5:11) you must REMAIN in Him,His Love ,by obeying him(John 15,john14:21) you must be KNOWN by God.(mat.7:21,22)(1

CHERRY PICKED BIBLE
A super-sale markdown to now just $6.66!  Get it while supplies last!  Ask for the Bill Erickson special edition.

john 2:3,4) whoever LOVES God is KNOWN by God. we must CONTINUE (Rom.2:7) to show our love for our LORD and saviour by obeying Him.and we must continue to GROW in this to the end.this message and false doctrine of OSAS is making complacent and lukewarm christains who are not MAKING EVERY EFFORT to enter THE REST.(heb.4:11,luke 13:24) the apostle Paul himself knew he COULD himself fall(be reprobate)if he did not continue to put his flesh under.MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS IN CHRIST,I PLEAD WITH YOU TO MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO WAGE WAR On YOuR FLESH,PURSUE RIGHTEOUSNESS,AND LOV E AMD SEEK GOD WITH ALL YOUR HEART.this is no practice run,we must get it right this time.IN LOVE, FELLOW WORKER IN CHRIST

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > BILL ERICKSON – If your view of conditional eternal security is correct, we have a major, major contradiction in the bible. If we have a contradiction in the bible, then the bible is not truly the world of God and we cannot trust it. According to Romans 11:29, one cannot possibly lose their salvation once it’s truly possessed …

“For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:23).

Here, you can see that eternal life is declared a “gift” from God. So what does God think about gifts? Answer …

“For the gifts and callings of God are without repentance” (Romans 11:29).

That means that the gift of eternal life is irrevocable … meaning that God is not going to take it away from you. This scripture directly contradicts the common statement made by many students and theologians of the bible that a works based salvation and maintaining of salvation must be employed in order to avoid a “disobedience” label that would condemn a person to eternal hell. Romans 11:29 is a direct contradiction to the “disobedience” argument. The disobedience scriptures that are often pointed out in scripture is not talking about a believer losing salvation. It is largely talking about being obedient to the gospel message of God’s required faith in Christ. If one chooses not to believe, he is eternally damned … or said another way, he is “disobedient to the covenant” or requirement of faith in Christ for eternal salvation. Well, there goes the “disobedience” based loss salvation view right out the window.

You also cite being “lukewarm” as being a condition in which one can lose their salvation. This scripture is often used entirely out of context to justify the view that one can lose their salvation. In Revelation 3:14–21, the Lord is describing the “lukewarm” heart attitude of those in the Laodicean church, an attitude manifested by their deeds. The Laodiceans were neither cold nor hot in relation to God, just lukewarm. Hot water can cleanse and purify; cold water can refresh and enliven. But lukewarm water carries no similar value. The Laodiceans understood the Lord’s analogy because their city drinking water came over an aqueduct from a spring six miles to the south, and it arrived disgustingly lukewarm. Laodicean water was not hot like the nearby hot springs that people bathed in, nor was it refreshingly cold for drinking. It was lukewarm, good for nothing. In fact, it was nauseating, and that was the Lord’s response to the Laodiceans—they sickened Him, and He said, “I am about to spit you out of my mouth” (verse 16). The letter to the church at Laodicea is the harshest of the seven letters to the churches in Asia Minor. By His indictment of their “deeds” (Revelation 3:15), Jesus makes it clear that this is a dead church. The members of this church see themselves as “rich” and self-sufficient, but the Lord sees them as “wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked” (verse 17). Their lukewarm faith was hypocritical; their church was full of unconverted, pretend Christians. Jesus frequently equates deeds with a person’s true spiritual state … “By their fruit you will recognize them,” and “Every good tree bears good fruit” (Matthew 7:16–17). Clearly, the lukewarm deeds of the Laodiceans were not in keeping with true salvation. The deeds of the true believer will be “hot” or “cold”—that is, they will benefit the world in some way and reflect the spiritual passion of a life transformed. Lukewarm deeds, however—those done without joy, without love, and without the fire of the Spirit—do harm to the watching world. The lukewarm are those who claim to know God but live as though He doesn’t exist. They may go to church and practice a form of religion, but their inner state is one of self-righteous complacency. They claim to be Christians, but their hearts are unchanged, and their hypocrisy is sickening to God. The fact that the lukewarm individuals to whom Christ speaks are not saved is seen in the picture of Jesus standing outside of the church (Revelation 3:20). He has not yet been welcomed into their midst. In love, the Lord rebukes and disciplines them, commanding them to repent (verse 19). He sees their lukewarm attitudes as “shameful nakedness” that needs to be clothed in the white garments of true righteousness (verse 18). He urges them to be earnest, or zealous, and commit themselves totally to Him. Our Lord is gracious and long-suffering and gives the lukewarm time to repent… that is, repent of their unbelief. They were not truly saved to begin with, thus spewed out of the mouth of God. The Laodiceans enjoyed material prosperity that, coupled with a semblance of true religion, led them to a false sense of security and independence (see Mark 10:23). The expression “I am rich; I have acquired wealth” (Revelation 3:17) stresses that the wealth attained came though self-exertion. Spiritually, they had great needs. A self-sufficient attitude and lukewarm faith are constant dangers when people live lives of ease and prosperity. This isn’t saying that it’s not o.k. to be well off financially and otherwise, but wealth has a tendency to deceive the unsaved that he or she doesn’t need God for anything, much less “saving” of any kind. The bottom line is that being lukewarm, scripturally speaking, is speaking of a person who is not saved to begin with. The lukewarm argument of a person being able to lose their salvation would contradict not only Romans 11:29 mentioned above, but would also contradict John 6:29 in which Jesus said he will lose no one, but raise them up on the last day. If Jesus was really saying what you think he was saying, then what are you going to do with the following words from the very mouth of Jesus …

And this is the Father’s will who sent me, that of all which he has given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day” (John 6:39).

You also cite John 14. This is not speaking of salvation by works, i.e. keeping his commandments as appears on the surface. This is speaking of a manifesting of himself to said person, not salvation. It’s fellowship vs. relationship. It has to be because of what Jesus said in John 6:39. The Expositor’s Greek Testament puts it this way …

“The conditions on which depended the manifestation of the departed Christ are then exhibited, ὁ ἔχων … ἐμαυτόν. The love to which Christ promises a manifestation of Himself is not an idle sentiment or shallow fancy, but a principle prompting obedience, ὁ ἔχων τὰς ἐντολάς μου, cf. 1 John 2:7; 1 John 4:21, 2 John 1:5; it means more than “hearing,” and is yet not equivalent to τηρῶν; it seems to point to the permanent possession of the commandments in consciousness. This finds its appropriate expression in τηρῶν αὐτάς—“keeping them,” observing them in the life. This is the expression and proof of love, and this love finds its response and reward in the love of the Father and of the Son, and in the manifestation of the Son to the individual. The appropriateness of introducing the Father and His love appears in John 14:24. The love of Christ is that which prompts the manifestation. ἐμφανίσω, the word is used by Moses in Exodus 33:13.”

Reynolds says:

“This remarkable word implies that the scene or place of the higher manifestation will be in (ἐν) the consciousness of the soul”. The word however is currently used for outward manifestation; although here the manifestation alluded to is inward. Cf. Judas’ words. The nature of the manifestation has already been explained, John 14:19.”

You also cite Romans 2:7. This also is taken out of context. You forgot the following verses, which explains the whole thing. The apostle Paul clarifies the effects of original sin in Romans 2:12, stating …

“All who sin apart from the law will perish apart from the law, and all who sin under the law will be judged by the law (Romans 2:12).

All men stand condemned before God, whether they are Jews or not, or to put it another way, whether they have the Law of God or not. Paul also states …

“For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23).

An exposition of Romans 10:4, which says … “Christ is the end of the law so that there may be righteousness for everyone who believes,” will help in understanding what is means that Christians are not under the law. If we are without Christ, we are justly condemned in God’s sight by the Law that was given to His servant Moses. However, we might argue that those who are not Jewish and therefore do not benefit from the knowledge of the Mosaic Law (including the moral and ceremonial laws), should not be condemned in the same way. This is dealt with by the Apostle in Romans 2:14-15, where he states that the Gentiles have the essence of God’s legal requirements already ingrained and so are just as much without excuse. The Law is the issue that has to be dealt with in order to bring us into a right relationship with God …

“Know that a man is not justified by observing the law, but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we, too, have put our faith in Christ Jesus that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by observing the law, because by observing the law no one will be justified” (Galatians 2:16).

This passage reveals that the Law cannot justify or make righteous any man in God’s sight, which is why God sent His Son to completely fulfil the requirements of the Law for all those who would ever believe in Him. Christ Jesus redeemed us from the curse that has been brought through the law by becoming a curse for us (Galatians 3:13). He substituted Himself in our place and upon the cross took the punishment that is justly ours so that we are no longer under the curse of the Law. In doing so, He fulfilled and upheld the requirements of the Law. This does not mean that Christians are to be lawless, as some advocate today—a teaching called antinomianism. Rather, it means that we are free from the Mosaic Law and instead under the law of Christ, which is to love God with all of our being and to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. Christ became the end of the Law by virtue of what He did on earth through His sinless life and His sacrifice on the cross. So, the Law no longer has any bearing over us because its demands have been fully met in the Lord Jesus Christ. Faith in Christ who satisfied the righteous demands of the Law restores us into a pleasing relationship with God and keeps us there. No longer under the penalty of the Law, we now live under the law of grace in the love of God. Well, so much for the Romans 2:7 conditional salvation view. Another one bites the dust.

You also cite Hebrews 4:11. You forgot the preceding verse and the verse that follows verse 11, which explains the whole thing and sides with a salvation without works …

“For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God did from his. Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” (Hebrew 4:10-12).

As one can plainly see, this is speaking of the possibility of falling from grace through unbelief to begin with, thus not saved to begin with. This is not talking about a believer losing salvation. It is speaking to Jews (and by extension gentiles) still under the law or good works in their attempt to obtain salvation to begin with. One enters rest from their lost state through belief. But one can fall short through unbelief in Christ. Again, this is not talking about a Christian who has already obtained salvation through belief. Well, so much for the Hebrews 4:11 conditional salvation and losing it view. Another one bites the dust.

You also cite Luke 13:24 which says the following … “Strive to enter in at the strait gate: for many, I say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be able.” This striving here is not talking about performing works to earn and keep salvation for a Christian believer. Again, Jesus was talking to Jews who were under the law trying to strive to keep the commandments to obtain their good standing with God. This is clearly seen when one reads the whole chapter and not just cherry pick one verse of it. Cherry picking leads to incorrect conclusions and a skewed context. Earlier in this chapter, it is clearly revealed what Jesus is talking about here. Jesus was saying that it does not matter of the outward “extremeness” of one group of sins over another group of people’s sins. Those who are in unbelief are lost period. If a person over here is moral and lives right, while another one over there is not a moral person and does not live right, it doesn’t matter, They both are lost and on their way to eternal damnation. This is a matter of JUDICIAL salvation, not about if a believer sins that they will lose their salvation if unrepented of. The sin of unbelief of who Christ is is the only thing that will damn a person. Was Jesus telling (the Galilaeans) that because they were less sinners than those other ones that they were more righteous and would not perish? Answer: no. The lesser sinners of these Galilaens were also eternally damned unless they repented. This is not speaking of the ceasing of outward acts of sin on the part of these Galilaens so that they would not perish. Jesus was making the point that all are condemned without the required condition of accepting Christ as the ultimate sacrifice. The Galilaens that Christ was speaking to in Luke 13 were of the synagogue and under the law. They were not believers. Christ is speaking about repentance of unbelief for the forgiveness of those sins. This scripture is being taken out of context on your part. When one holds the conditional salvation view, it contradicts John 6:39 wherein Jesus said he would lose no one. It contradicts Romans 11:39 wherein Paul stated that the gifts and callings of God are without repentance, or irrevocable, meaning that God isn’t going to take it back. Obviously, if your view is correct, we have a major, major contradiction in the bible. With all due respect, isn’t it kinda obvious by now? Can you not see the contradiction here? Another conditional salvation view bites the dust.

DARREL HICKS – There no so think of eternal security not in the bible.  2 Corinthians

cherry tongue roll
2 Corinthians 5:10 … An extra sweet cherry that begs for foreplay before being consumed in sweet passion.  

5:10) For we must all appear before the judgement seat of Christ ; that every one may receive the things done in his body , according to that he hath done , whether it be good or bad.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > DARREL HICKS – The Judgment Seat of Christ is not a judgment that determines whether Christians are saved or lost. This is a judgment to determine our reward or lack thereof. If a Christian could lose salvation at this judgment, it would contradict John 6:39 in which Jesus says that he will lose no one, but raise them up on the last day …

“We must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each of us may receive what is due us for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad.” (2 Corinthians:5-10).

In context, it is clear that both passages refer to Christians, not unbelievers. The judgment seat of Christ, therefore, involves believers giving an account of their lives to Christ for reward, not to determine salvation. The judgment seat of Christ does not determine salvation; that was determined by Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf (1 John 2:2) and our faith in Him (John 3:16). All of our sins are forgiven, and we will never be condemned for them (Romans 8:1). We should not look at the judgment seat of Christ as God judging our sins, but rather as God rewarding us for our lives. Yes, as the Bible says, we will have to give an account of ourselves. Part of this is surely answering for the sins we committed. However, that is not going to be the primary focus of the judgment seat of Christ. At the judgment seat of Christ, believers are rewarded based on how faithfully they served Christ (1 Corinthians 9:4-27; 2 Timothy 2:5). Some of the things we might be judged on are how well we obeyed the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20), how victorious we were over sin (Romans 6:1-4), and how well we controlled our tongues (James 3:1-9). The Bible speaks of believers receiving crowns for different things based on how faithfully they served Christ (1 Corinthians 9:4-27; 2 Timothy 2:5). The various crowns are described in 2 Timothy 2:5, 2 Timothy 4:8, James 1:12, 1 Peter 5:4, and Revelation 2:10. James 1:12 is a good summary of how we should think about the judgment seat of Christ …

“Blessed is the man who perseveres under trial, because when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love him” (James 1:12).

In the end, you have taken this scripture out of context.

DARREL HICKS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – 2 Thessalonians 1:8) In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ:

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > DARREL HICKS – Obeying the gospel to receive salvation as stated in Hebrews 5:8-9, 2 Thessalonians 1:5 and 1 Peter 4:17 is speaking about believing on Christ for salvation. First off, one has to properly understand exactly what the gospel is in order to properly obey it. Jesus explained what the gospel is in many places, and guess what, it’s not obedience in performing works to obtain salvation or keeping it. Jesus plainly said that the gospel message of salvation is wrapped up in faith in him (John 3:15-16) and John 3:18 which boldly declares …

“He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God” (John 3:18).

See, it’s faith, not works period. That being the case, the only way to “obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ” as stated in 2 Thessalonians 1:8 is to believe. That is what these “obey” scriptures are speaking about.

CHEEZ ITS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING … I have a question for you or anyone here that can answer this and its urgent because I can’t deal with this anymore not knowing for sure! And this is not a joke and I’m being dead serious so please read this and get back to me because I want and need to know. Here’s the deal and what happened. I as far as I know was saved and a Christian and had a lot of really horrible things happen to me and really started to think God wasn’t real and if he was that he was evil. So I started looking on the internet for proof of God and during my searching came across satanists saying God was evil and that satan was the real God and so much better and that that was why Christians had so many problems and bad things happen to them, I was literally at the point of dispair and in dire straits and God wasn’t answering, I couldn’t do it anymore and didn’t really believe in God at that point in my life and thought if he was real he was mean, evil and loved suffering, and I needed to believe in something as someone who had believed in a God all my life, so I went on the joy of satan website (see where it says dedicate your soul to satan) and did that. I then started worshipping satan for about 5 months. I seen nothing and didn’t feel any different. So I gave it up. But then a few months later felt maybe I did something wrong and repented in case God was real and in case I made a mistake (not to take a chance.) Some months go by and I was struggling having such a hard time thinking there was no God and that when we die that’s it, no point to this life, I was desperate to believe in something and had to see if there was anything true to any of this, so I did the dedicate your soul to satan thing again and started worshipping satan again, (keep in mind I did this twice, not once BUT TWICE after repenting of it once already from doing it before and after being a saved Christian doing it the first time!) Once again nothing after doing it again and worshipping satan for a few months the second time I did it and gave it up, at that point I was faced with what I thought was the fact none of it was real and God didn’t exist and if he did he was mean and didn’t care, that is until I was sitting watching tv one day and seen something that made me know God was undeniably real and that Jesus was real and the savior. I immediately panicked and became terrified knowing for certain God and Jesus was real and that it was true, more terrified than I ever had been in my life when I knew it was all true and that God and Jesus really were real, I thought I had done something irrevocable and unchangeable and that I couldn’t be forgiven of what I had done and had damned myself to hell forever no matter what, but despite thinking that I got on my knees and cried (literally) and repented like never in my life and cried out to God and Jesus and did what’s known as the sinners prayer and asked Jesus to come into my heart and life and save me and accepted him as Savior. Since then (3 years ago) I have fully believed and lived my life for him. But I quite a bit have the feeling that maybe I did something I’m not truly forgiven for and possibly never can be forgiven for and sometimes feel (or wonder) if I have been forgiven and if I’m doomed/damned and damned myself with no chance of forgiveness. So in a situation like this can a person be forgiven and saved? That’s what I want to know and and cannot find an answer to this anywhere, can you or someone on here answer this question please because I can’t live this way anymore not knowing for sure!

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > CHEEZ ITS … The answer to your question is an unequivocal yes. That answer is based on scripture itself. I would first say that you never lost your salvation to begin with if you truly possessed it. That statement is also based upon scripture. Second of all, I would suggest taking a look at a couple of things that Jesus had to say regarding this issue. Jesus made the absolute final, clear-cut and unequivocal statement that leaves no room for doubt. He said it in Matthew 12 …

“Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come” (Matthew 12:31-32).

He said that “ALL” manner of sin shall be forgiven men. That includes yours. As you can see from the rest of what Jesus stated that the only sin that cannot and will not be forgiven is the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, and you need not worry about that because it mainly has to do with the unsaved person who rejects Christ. In order to fullly grasp what Jesus said regarding blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, one must understand the setting and context. The concept of “blasphemy against the Spirit” is mentioned in Mark 3:22–30 and Matthew 12:22–32. Jesus has just performed a miracle. A demon-possessed man was brought to Jesus, and the Lord cast the demon out, healing the man of blindness and muteness. The eyewitnesses to this exorcism began to wonder if Jesus was indeed the Messiah they had been waiting for. A group of Pharisees, hearing the talk of the Messiah, quickly quashed any budding faith in the crowd: “It is only by Beelzebul, the prince of demons, that this fellow drives out demons,” they said (Matthew 12:24). Jesus rebuts the Pharisees with some logical arguments for why He is not casting out demons in the power of Satan (Matthew 12:25–29). Then He speaks of the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit:

“I tell you, every kind of sin and slander can be forgiven, but blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come” (verses 31–32).

The term blasphemy may be generally defined as “defiant irreverence.” The term can be applied to such sins as cursing God or willfully degrading things relating to God. Blasphemy is also attributing some evil to God or denying Him some good that we should attribute to Him. This particular case of blasphemy, however, is called “the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit” in Matthew 12:31. The Pharisees, having witnessed irrefutable proof that Jesus was working miracles in the power of the Holy Spirit, claimed instead that the Lord was possessed by a demon (Matthew 12:24). Notice in Mark 3:30 Jesus is very specific about what the Pharisees did to commit blasphemy against the Holy Spirit: “He said this because they were saying, ‘He has an impure spirit.’” Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit has to do with accusing Jesus Christ of being demon-possessed instead of Spirit-filled. This particular type of blasphemy cannot be duplicated today. The Pharisees were in a unique moment in history: they had the Law and the Prophets, they had the Holy Spirit stirring their hearts, they had the Son of God Himself standing right in front of them, and they saw with their own eyes the miracles He did. Never before in the history of the world (and never since) had so much divine light been granted to men; if anyone should have recognized Jesus for who He was, it was the Pharisees. Yet they chose defiance. They purposely attributed the work of the Spirit to the devil, even though they knew the truth and had the proof. Jesus declared their willful blindness to be unpardonable. Their blasphemy against the Holy Spirit was their final rejection of God’s grace. They had set their course, and God was going to let them sail into perdition unhindered. Jesus told the crowd that the Pharisees’ blasphemy against the Holy Spirit “will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come” (Matthew 12:32). This is another way of saying that their sin would never be forgiven, ever. Not now, not in eternity. As Mark 3:29 puts it, “They are guilty of an eternal sin.” The immediate result of the Pharisees’ public rejection of Christ (and God’s rejection of them) is seen in the next chapter. Jesus, for the first time, “told them many things in parables” (Matthew 13:3; cf. Mark 4:2). The disciples were puzzled at Jesus’ change of teaching method, and Jesus explained His use of parables …

“Because the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them. . . . Though seeing, they do not see; though hearing, they do not hear or understand” (Matthew 13:11,13).

Jesus began to veil the truth with parables and metaphors as a direct result of the Jewish leaders’ official denunciation of Him. Again, the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit cannot be repeated today, although some people try. Jesus Christ is not on earth—He is seated at the right hand of God. No one can personally witness Jesus performing a miracle and then attribute that power to Satan instead of the Spirit. The unpardonable sin today is the state of continued unbelief. The Spirit currently convicts the unsaved world of sin, righteousness, and judgment (John 16:8). To resist that conviction and willfully remain unrepentant is to “blaspheme” the Spirit. There is no pardon, either in this age or in the age to come, for a person who rejects the Spirit’s promptings to trust in Jesus Christ and then dies in unbelief.  So, bottom line is that this sin deals with unbelief, or in other words, the unsaved person. The love of God is evident …

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16).

And the choice is clear …

“Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life, but whoever rejects the Son will not see life, for God’s wrath remains on him” (John 3:36). I

It’s important to keep in mind that all of a believer’s sins past, present and future are forgiven in Christ.

CHEEZ ITS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING … thank you for answering that and for taking the time and effort you put into that, I really appreciate that, thank you. I guess I also have another question pertaining to the same thing and same thing I did (same question but I left something out that I did when I did that “the dedicate your soul to satan thing.”) When I dedicated my soul to satan I was so mad and upset (and basically every awful broken feeling you could imagine) at God at that time because as I said I had been thru so many unspeakable unbearable things in my life all the way thru life one right after another and as I said that lead me to believe God wasn’t real or if he was he was evil and mean which made me when I did that (dedicate my soul to satan) also tell Jesus I reject u and want u out of my heart and nothing to do with u because I was so mad upset and broken and didn’t think God was real and if he was thought he was mean and evil, now that is the part that really scares me having done that/said that other than the part of doing the dedicate your soul to satan thing (not to mention I cussed at God and said really horrible things to him as well.) What if I did that as well? Is that still forgivable and can I still be saved? Doing that (that part specifically) really scares me telling Jesus something like that and I’d like to know if that’s still forgivable and if I can still be saved if I’ve done that. That’s what really worries me. I feel like I’ve committed the worst son imaginable and even tho I’ve repented of all of that like u can’t even begin to imagine and have asked Jesus to save me and into my heart I still often feel like I’m not forgiven and it creeps up in the back of my mind a lot and scares the heck out of me, I don’t like this and wish I’d never done it! So if I did something like that (telling Jesus I hate him, I reject him and told him I wanted him out of my heart when I did that,) is that forgivable and can I still be saved?!

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > CHEEZ ITS … Yes, you are still saved. The key point to realize is that what you said to him does not qualify as being blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. The very fact that you came back to him and are concerned that you have blown it with him is proof positive that you are still saved. It’s important to understand that the Holy Spirit is the one that is responsible for anyone coming to Christ to begin with. No one can even get saved without the Holy Spirit drawing that person to Christ to begin with. This being the case, the fact that you are concerned about it and repented is proof-positive that you are still saved and that the Holy Spirit is still resident within you as a believer. Your fear is your human emotions at work. They will tell you one thing, but salvation is not based upon any human outbursts or anger at God. The Holy Spirit drew you back to him, which is proof positive that you have nothing to fear. The depth of any human sin is not more powerful than the saving grace of God and his ability to seal us unto the day of redemption. The Bible is clear on the fact that we are sealed unto the day of redemption. God is not dangling this over your head. He doesn’t work according to human standards. You’ve repented and you have no reason to worry. Job had been lying in unrelieved misery for months with open sores all over his body. During this time, he bore the grief of seven dead sons and three dead daughters. All of his wealth had vanished in one afternoon. He had become repulsive to his wife, loathsome to his brothers, and even little children despised him as he lay on the ash heap outside of town. At first Job bore these calamities with amazing submission …

“The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord (Job 1:21) . . . “Shall we receive good at the hand of the Lord, and shall we not receive evil?” (Job 2:10).

But as the misery drug out over the months, Job wavered in his confidence that God was for him. Job spoke very angry words at God. In defending himself against the bad theology of Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, he said things about God that were not true. He began to insist on his own righteousness at the expense of God’s justice. But his suffering was for a purpose not known to Job. Eventually, God restored to Job more than what he lost, even after Job questioned God in his anger and disappointment at God. This is a prime example that God doesn’t cast away to eternal damnation one of his own simply because they are angry with God.

CHEEZ ITS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING … Thank you so much for that email man! That was honestly the best email I’ve ever read and reassuring, I will trust that, I feel so much better, thank you! And thank you for taking the time to write all that and the effort you put into it. You are a good person and a true Christian! See you in heaven my brother in Christ, and hopefully soon (as I feel it will be and hope so, can’t take much more of this satanic world.) Thank you so much man!

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > CHEEZ ITS … You’re certainly welcome. Peace brother and see you soon.

JESUS AND GAMERS – Can anyone help me? Do not think I can agree with this sermon. See below on just 2 pieces of scripture, but there are more: 2 Timothy 2:12 Correct me if I’m wrong, but this book is addressing Timothy and/or the church at that time. Church would mean saved people that have accepted Christ as Lord and Savior. I don’t think that is in dispute by anyone. Verse 12 makes a conditional statement, for it says ‘IF we endure, we shall also reign with Him’ and IF we deny Him, He will also deny us’. So the inverse would also be true, which would be If we DO NOT endure, we shall NOT reign with Him. In the KJV, it says in verse 12 ‘If we suffer, we shall also reign with Him (conditional again). If we deny Him, He also will deny us (conditional again, but on denying Him). My understanding (I could be wrong) is that this is written to Timothy, or the church. If this is written to the church (church would include people that are saved), then there would be no need to interject verse 12 into the scripture here. Jesus’s ability to remain faithful isn’t written off by verse 12, as He will always be with us, or available to us if we choose Him. If we do not, He is still there, but denying or leaving Him would fall into verse 12 here. If there is a translation issue from Greek or the language of origin, let me know so I can research. Romans Chapter 11:29 KJV says ‘For the GIFTS and CALLING of God are without Repentance’. NKJV says Gifts and Calling of God are irrevocable. The gifts referred to here I believe are the spiritual gifts, as it is written in PLURAL form. Salvation would be singular if even that would be what it is referring to. But when I go to verse 22 & 23, it discusses being severed. To be severed, you must first be part of a whole(assumption of being saved originally). Verse 23 illustrates someone ‘that continued in unbelief will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in AGAIN’. To be “grafted again” would be you once were, but no longer, otherwise, grafting again would be a useless verse. So that tells me logically that if I can be grafted again, that means I can return after having “left”. The parable of the 10 virgins is such a huge illustration and parallel to believers. In the way it was written in Matthew 25, all 10 virgins were preparing for the return of Christ (Bridegroom). So logic tells me all 10 believed in His return. But 5 of them did not adequately prepare for his return (not enough oil). When the bridegroom arrived, He says He didn’t know them and were left behind. Jesus further emphasizes to be on ALERT, because we do not know the hour/day in which He will return. If I am eternally secure, what is the point of being alert? What would that gain us to be on alert, or to be prepared? Thoughts? I’ve been researching this across articles, videos, etc trying to come to a personal conclusion, but there are so many verses leading to the loss of salvation that are directed to the church.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESENDING > JESUS AND GAMERS – The verse in question you spoke of, verse 12, isn’t speaking of the loss of salvation. It is speaking about reigning and ruling with Christ in the future 1,000 year millennial reign, or kingdom of Christ, on earth. This kingdom of Christ begins after the approaching seven-year Tribulation period of judgment on earth after the event of the rapture occurs. Paul also wrote this during a time of great persecution of true Christians under the rule of the vast and wicked mighty Roman Empire. It was during a time of hardness for the church and Christians in general. The verse in question says that if we suffer with him, we shall also “reign” with him. Basically, if we as Christians take up our cross and do what the Lord is leading us and asking us to do in service to Christ and winning souls (our Christian service and duty to God), then we will rule with him in the millennial kingdom. If we don’t, rewards may be lost and we won’t rule with him. We will still be saved and in the Kingdom of Heaven, but the loss of reward is in view here, not salvation. Oftentimes, when serving the Lord and doing what he would have each and everyone one of us to do for him for the sake of edifying the body of Christ (the true church) and spreading his message of salvation to our immediate circle or further, it can cause us suffering in this life. When we yield our lives to him in this manner and do what he asked us to do personally and/or collectively, we have to sacrifice what we wanted to do with our lives. Again, this often causes personal suffering. This is the jist of 2 Timothy. We will be rewarded for it greatly in the coming Kingdom of Christ on earth. This is indirectly referring to an event that will occur after the rapture of the true church called the “judgment seat of Christ” described in 2 Corinthians 5:10. This will not be a judgment to determine whether a true born again Christian is saved or lost, but it will be a judgment to determine whether rewards are won or lost based on whether or not we served the Lord with a pure motive. This is when it will be determined whether or not we will reign with Christ as Paul mentioned in 2 Timothy. Further, when Paul spoke of him denying us if we deny him cannot mean the loss of salvation. We know that Peter denied the Lord three times under the Roman threat of being crucified if he identified with Christ just before his crucifixion. But we know that Jesus later encouraged Peter in his anguish over his weakness in denying the Lord to the Roman soldiers. We know that Peter will be in Heaven despite his denial of knowing Christ. Romans 11:22-23 is also not speaking of the loss of salvation for the true born again saved believer. This is basically warning the gentiles in general about falling into unbelief like ancient Israel did. He is warning that God will eventually open the eyes of the Jews when gentile nations start falling into unbelief toward the gospel covenant of salvation in Christ. This has nothing to do with an already saved believer. It’s about grafting Israel back into the Olive Tree and severing off the unsaved masses of gentiles when they start falling into unbelief. See the videos below for more on that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-HY_2SIb88&t=11s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Be-sC6poPs

Romans 11:29 declares that the gifts and callings of God are without repentance. That means that God isn’t going to take them back. That would include the gift of salvation, or eternal life. Eternal life is referred to as a gift in Romans 6:23. I’ve also covered many of the other verses that seem to indicate the loss of salvation in my article I’ve written in the link below. I’ve presented them in their true meaning and context.  The article is called “ETERNAL SECURITY DEBATE 1: CAN A PERSON LOSE THEIR SALVATION ONCE SAVED?

https://endtimesdarknessdescending.wordpress.com/2017/07/28/the-eternal-security-debate-can-a-person-lose-their-salvation-once-saved/

As to your concern with the parable of the ten virgins, this cannot be referring to a true, born again, saved believer being left behind on earth to go through the horror of the Tribulation period when the rapture occurs. God is not a wife beater. The five virgins who have the extra oil represent the truly born again who are looking with eagerness to the coming of Christ. They have saving faith and have determined that, whatever occurs, be it lengthy time or adverse circumstances, when Jesus returns, they will be looking with eagerness. The five virgins without the oil represent false believers who enjoy the benefits of the Christian community without true love for Christ. In other words, they are not really saved to begin with although they may have the outward facade of being a Christian. They are more concerned about the party than about longing to see the bridegroom. Their hope is that their association with true believers (“give us some of your oil” of verse 8) will bring them into the kingdom at the end. This, of course, is never the case. One person’s faith in Jesus cannot save another. The “Lord, lord” and “I do not know you” of verses 11 and 12 fit very well with Jesus’ condemnation of the false believers of Matthew 7:21-23 …

“Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter. Many will say to Me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many miracles?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness” (Matthew 7:21-23).

Further still, oil is representative of the Holy Spirit. When a lost person (unsaved person) gets saved, the Holy Spirit immediately takes up residence within that person the moment they personally believe on Christ and receive him as their personal savior into their heart. These are the five virgins that have the oil of the Holy Spirit inside of them. The fact that the other five did not have oil and had the door closed on them indicates that they were not saved. They did not have the oil of the Holy Spirit on the inside of them, indicating that they are not truly born again, or had never truly received Christ. Again, the oil in scripture is representative of the Holy Spirit. Therefore, the conclusion of the matter is that the five virgins who are left out were not saved. It is not referring to a truly saved, born again believer.

JESUS AND GAMERS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – Hello again. I have a general question, and then I’ll move to the specifics. When you approach the gospel, do you approach it FIRST with accepting Eternal Security (once saved always saved), or do you approach it neutrally and THEN seek to find where each area regarding this topic leads you? I am approaching this as unbiased as I can as a starting point during my research, so I was curious if you were as well. Ok, so for 2 Tim 2:12. I just read chapter 1 and 2 up to verse 13. When I read the intention of this book up to this point, this appears to be a letter from Paul to Timothy basically urging him to “keep the good fight” and from what I can tell, has no prophetic references . Paul writes in verses 10-11, he references the reward of Eternal Glory and Salvation. Verse 11 goes on to say ‘this is a faithful and trustworthy saying’. Then it goes into the portion i referenced originally about enduring, denying, etc. That is why I ask if your starting point is neutral or if it begins biased. I don’t see anything here that would point toward the particular period of the 1000 year reign. Now, if you begin with believing in eternal security, then the only place to point to is the 1000 year reign possibly being the only logical conclusion, but you would FIRST have to believe in the eternal security before leaping to the 1000 year reign. As for Peter, yes he denied Jesus 3 times. However I feel I can safely assume he would have repented from ever denying Jesus, which if you don’t believe in eternal security, would be just fine in having that sin forgiven. But I see no remote mention of the 1000 year period in 2 Timothy up to this point. In Romans 11, I am finding a piece that does not go along with what you are saying. Here is what I’m showing… Verse 13 shows the conversation turns to the gentiles now. Verse 17 talks about gentiles (us) being grafted in and becoming a partaker of the root of the olive tree. Verse 18 warns about not boasting. Verse 19 talks about being broken off, which could be the Jews that didn’t believe, so no argument there. Verse 22 (Still speaking about Gentiles), it says ‘Therefore consider the goodness and severity of God,on those who fell, severity, but toward you, goodness (at this point goodness b/c these gentiles are believers), IF you continue in His Goodness.” right here, there is a conditional statement that severity will come to you if you do not continue in His goodness, meaning there is a choice. It goes on to say “Otherwise, you also will be cut off”. To be cut off, you have to at one point be in. The conversation is with Gentiles, which were not originally God’s people (Jews). For a gentile to be cut off, the gentile would first have to be grafted in to be cut off, as you cannot cut something off that wasn’t part of the whole (olive tree). Verse 23 sounds like it could be referring to the Jews, that they could be grafted in again. But i cannot ignore the stern warning as written if I follow the passage. Can you share some thoughts on that piece?  everything you wrote I can take as “possible”, but there is a part that appears wrong if I read this. The idea that the 5 foolish virgins were not believers seems like a stretch to me, as they, just like the 5 wise ones, were sitting there waiting for the return of the bridegroom, but I’ll accept that as possible as you have written it. The problem I have is with the oil symbolizing the holy spirit as meaning only the ones with oil for their lamp are saved. Here is the logic here on this one: 1-The foolish virgins were asking for oil, but the response was that they could not give it or they too would not have enough. It didn’t say we CANNOT give you any, but it plainly says they would not have enough. If that symbolizes the holy spirit, it would have been impossible to give and even less so, impossible to go to the market and buy. Perhaps if the passage said, go and prepare your own oil, or something like that, then MAYBE, but if I read it plainly, as written, the oil cannot be the Holy Spirit because you either have the Holy Spirit, or you do not. 2-The second piece is he last part of verse 8. It says “for our lamps are going out”, which means they did have oil, just not enough. Again, the holy spirit cannot be the oil, as the Holy Spirit does not drain. If the passage said we have no oil at all to light our lamp, then MAYBE it could be taken that way, but that wasn’t the case. This speaks to me again as written that the 5 foolish virgins were simply not prepared. They had oil, but did not take care to have enough, to endure, to persevere until the coming of the Lord. This sounds more like a Lukewarm christian, who has accepted Christ at some point, but isnt’ doing anything and sits around being lukewarm. Can you share some thoughts on this one too? This is really helping my research. I will admit, I am focusing my entire research on scripture directly, without external sources, as I believe the Bible to be the complete source of truth in my spiritual walk. Thank you and God bless you.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JESUS AND GAMERS – To answer your first question, I approach the gospel neutrally and then seek to find where it leads, no matter where that may be. One rule of thumb that one must always remember is that if the Bible is truly the inspired word of God, then it cannot contradict itself as I said often in my above conversation with Stephen Russel and others in my article. If it does contradict itself, then it’s not truly the word of God and we cannot trust it. However, knowing that the Bible is indeed provably and demonstratably the inspired and preserved word of God, then it’s doctrines cannot contradict each other. That is the one rule the Holy Spirit revealed to me when I first started voraciously researching this subject, probably the most important subject in existence. Before I got saved, I was pretty darn petrified of what would happen to me after death. I would see documentaries and such on regular television of what happened to people who had NDEs, or what is called near death experiences. Some would describe descending into an eternity of horrendous torments. That really bothered me for the longest time. I then began a quest for answers. I had always had a reverence and respect for the Bible, but didn’t know what was really in it or what it was about. All I knew is that it was something to pay attention to because it was important. It had the answers. This set me on a course of discovery that would lead me to salvation. I didn’t get saved as a result of my own study, but I had read an end times book that explained salvation itself. I got saved from reading that book. But then, as I would start listening to ministers and reading certain Christian articles regarding the subject of salvation, I kept hearing the idea that you better make sure you are not committing the sin of thus and so, or you won’t make it, regardless of the fact that I had received Christ as my savior. This also started to not make sense to me. I researched the subject with a neutral starting point, and went from there. I began to notice that certain scriptures that certain ministers were using to say that a truly saved, born again believer could lose salvation was contradicting the scriptures that I was reading. This created all kinds of fear and confusion for me. That is when the Holy Spirit revealed to me that the word of God does not contradict itself. Either it is or it isn’t. Either you’re secure or you’re not. Based on this alone, there is no choice but to accept that true salvation, if it is possessed, cannot be lost. Even if there may be one or two scriptures that you cannot quite explain, if there are others that are more clear that you cannot lose salvation, then the conclusion of once saved always saved must stand and must be correct if its truly the word of God. Again, because the Bible cannot contradict itself. This is where it is important to understand that a true and important doctrine such as “once saved always saved” needs to be fleshed out by employing the method of Isaiah 28:10

“For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little” (Isaiah 28:10).

With this in mind, I’ll move on to your other scriptural points of concern. You mentioned verses 10-11 where he mentions the reward of salvation and eternal glory. But back up to the previous verse and it is made clearer that salvation and eternal glory is not an earned outcome for an already saved believer. Verse 9 reveals that Timothy suffered trouble as an evil doer according to the judgment of Rome and it’s persecution against him and fellow followers of Christ, even to the point of being in bonds. He then states in the following verse that he endures this suffering for the elect’s sake that they too may obtain salvation through his hard work of spreading the gospel message of Christ. This portion of scripture reveals that the elect here are not saved to begin with. Either these elect are talking about the fellow Jews, who are not saved to begin with, or they are the elect that are pre-destined to eventually receive salvation, but are not saved yet. This is what Timothy is getting at here. It’s not about an already saved believer. Verse 12 then reveals that when believers suffer for the cause of Christ, they shall “reign” with him. When Paul wrote this to Timothy, obviously, Christ was not yet reigning on earth. This comes during the 1,000 year miillennial reign after the rapture and seven years of judgment. This is why I said that this is a reference or link to this future prophetic event. But again, it has to do with a believer “reigning” or “ruling” with him, not salvation itself. There will be many Christians in the kingdom that will be safe and saved and eternally secure that won’t be ruling and reigning with him. They won’t have any reward …

“Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off” (verse 22).

The first thing that should be noted is that this is not referring to an individual believer. If you keep reading in the following verses, it all starts to become clearer that individual saved believers who are already in the body of Christ are not in view here. This is speaking about the fact that if gentiles nationally start falling into unbelief, God is able to graft Israel back into the covenant and severity will fall upon the gentiles as a whole, or as a group. Severity fell upon ancient Israel as whole because they fell into unbelief and were judged. They were judged by the light of the gospel being withdrawn from them nationally. Eventually, they were physically judged when the Romans came in and took the nation captive. This is when God turned his attention to the gentile world. The verses that follow after verse 22 start to make that clear and stand out that he is not warning individual, already saved believers who are in the body of Christ, or a part of the covenant of salvation through Christ. I can see where you can read into it that it may be saying that, but the following verses after verse 22 drop a stink bomb on that idea. If it were not so, then you have a major, major problem with what Jesus said in John 6:29, Romans 11:29 and a myriad of other scripture that indicates salvation cannot be lost. You would end up in a world of confusing contradiction. Not continuing in his goodness, or outward acts of goodness in your Christian walk, is not referring to an already saved, individual believer losing salvation. Let me elaborate further … Paul compares Israel to the natural branches of a cultivated olive tree and the Gentile believers to the branches of a wild olive tree. The natural branches (Israel) were broken off, and the wild branches (Gentiles) were grafted in (verse 17). The Gentiles, then, have been made partakers of the promises and inherit the blessings of God’s salvation. It is important to understand how God called Israel to be His people and how they failed to fulfill that calling. As the seed of Abraham, the children of Israel were chosen by God to be a separate people, holy to the Lord. God’s design was for them to be a light to the Gentiles so that they, too, might know God (Genesis 18:17–19; Isaiah 42, 49). Instead, the Israelites chased foreign gods and betrayed their calling (Ezekiel 23; Hosea 11). But God, who knew they would do this, had already promised to restore His kingdom to Israel after they rebelled and then eventually repented (Deuteronomy 30:1–10). So God sent His Son, preceded by a forerunner, to invite Israel to “repent, for the Kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matthew 3:2; 4:17). However, when Jesus revealed Himself as the promised Davidic King who would restore Israel (Matthew 11—12; Acts 3:19–22), He was rejected by the Jews, exactly as Isaiah had prophesied (Isaiah 52—53). Jesus therefore called His disciples to fulfill Abraham’s commission to bless the nations (Genesis 12:2–3) by preaching the gospel of the Kingdom to all nations until the end of this age (Matthew 28:18–20). Paul thus preached the gospel of the Kingdom to the Jews and was repeatedly rejected (Acts 13—28); in consequence, Paul brought the good news to the Gentiles, who in turn became Abraham’s spiritual seed by faith and heirs of the promises to Abraham and his seed (Galatians 3—4). This is what Paul meant in Romans 11 by the Gentiles being “grafted” into the “olive tree” and nourished by the “root” (the promises to Abraham). The tree thus signifies the collective people of God; the “wild branches” grafted in are Gentile believers; the “natural branches” that are cut off are the Jews in unbelief. Jewish believers remain in the tree but are joined with Gentiles and “made” into a “new body,” the Church (Ephesians 2:11–22). Paul anticipated a question that would surely arise among his Gentile readers: “I say then, have they stumbled that they should fall?” (Romans 11:1)—Gentile believers would be tempted to dismiss Israel because it appeared they would never recover. Even today, there are those who advocate supersessionism or replacement theology, which holds that the Church has completely replaced Israel and will inherit the promises to be fulfilled only in a spiritual sense. In other words, according to this view, ethnic Israel is forever excluded from the promises—the Jews will not literally inherit the Promised Land. What then would happen to Israel? What about the Old Testament prophecies that Israel as a nation would repent and be re-gathered to the land in the last days as a permanent possession (Deuteronomy 30:1–10)? Romans 11 thus conclusively shows Gentile believers that God is not yet “done” with Israel, who has only temporarily lost the privilege of representing God as His people. Since “the gifts and calling of God are irrevocable” (11:29), “all Israel will be saved” in order to fulfill God’s covenant with ethnic Israel (11:25–28), including the promise of land inheritance (Deuteronomy 30:1–10). While the “natural branches” were cut off because Israel failed, God’s purposes are not complete until Israel is also grafted back into the people of God to share in the promises to Abraham and his seed. This brings full circle God’s larger redemptive plan (Romans 11:30–36) for both Jews and Gentiles as distinct populations within the people of God in the Davidic (or Millennial) Kingdom. Indeed, the prophets saw this Kingdom as the “final form” of the olive tree, so that Israel—reversing roles—would then bless the Gentiles, enabling them to join the people of God (see Zechariah 8:13, 20–23). With all of this in mind, nothing that Paul said in Romans 11 could possibly be referring to a saved, born again believer losing salvation, or being cut off, if they do not continue in his goodness. Hope that helps you out.

We need to rid ourselves of the false conception that the five foolish virgins ran out of oil. The text is clear on this point; the five foolish virgins never brought any oil with them. A footnote in the NET Bible indicates that the word “extra” is not found in the Greek text, but has been supplied because the context implies it. I don’t think so at all. Surely the author is able to clearly supply this detail, so crucial to the interpretation of this parable. But he did not. Why do we wish to think they brought any oil with them? Perhaps it is because we read that the virgins claimed that their lamps were “going out” in verse 8. Would they all have been burning their torches for lighting the inside of the house where they all waited and slept? Would there not be the normal lighting in that place? Why would all five run out at the same time, just when they were preparing their lamps? I would understand that the lamps were transported without oil in them. If they traveled in the daylight, these lamps would not have been needed on their journey to the wedding place. The reason the wise virgins brought oil was because the oil was carried in flasks and added to the lamps at the time of need. There must have been some residue of oil on the rag or wick of the five empty lamps, which quickly burned out, only moments after being lit. This would explain why all five torches went out at the same time. Perhaps, too, these foolish virgins minimized their foolishness by describing their plight as “running out” so as to look less foolish. Not only is the text clear about the foolish virgins bringing no oil with them, it is difficult to interpret the parable if, indeed, they did run out of oil. The difference between the five wise virgins and the five foolish virgins is salvation. These five foolish virgins were not once saved, but then “ran out” of salvation. They were lost, and never had it. They never had oil. They were just empty lamps. They looked useful, they seemed to give promise of light, but they never produced it. Let us not seek to supply what the author has purposefully omitted (any oil) in a way that makes us feel better about the story. We are not supposed to feel good about these five foolish, oil-less virgins. With these things in mind, let us seek to paraphrase the story. There was a wedding, to which ten young virgins were invited as participants. It would seem that in some way they were instructed to bring lamps, so that at the right time they could form or lead some kind of torchlight procession. All ten virgins brought their lamps, but only five brought the necessary oil as well. They all waited for the groom to arrive. Time passed and darkness set in. The groom tarried longer than expected and so all ten bridesmaids (virgins) slept until he arrived. Suddenly, at midnight someone cried out that the groom was approaching. All ten virgins are awakened by this cry, and they begin to prepare their lamps for ceremonial service. The need for these lamps is now particularly obvious (it is midnight, pitch dark). The five foolish virgins ask the five wise virgins to share their oil, but their request is denied. It wasn’t that the five wise virgins didn’t care; it was because there would not be enough oil for all ten lamps. Better to have a torchlight parade with five working lamps than with ten non-functioning, lightless, lamps. The foolish virgins were told to go purchase their own oil, which they did. But during their absence the torchlight parade took place, and the groom, accompanied by the five wise virgins entered the celebration hall. The doors were then closed. Later, the five foolish virgins arrived, with oil, but it was too late. That part of the festivities had already been completed. There was no need for the services of these five virgins, and they were not allowed to enter and join in the wedding celebration. Even though the five virgins pled, “Lord, Lord … ,” they were sent away with the words, “I do not know you!” Our Lord then concludes this parable by applying it to His disciples (and thus the church). He urges His disciples to stay alert, because they, too, do not know the day or the hour of His return. Jesus wants us to be careful about assuming we are saved, if indeed we are not. It is for this reason that the apostles challenge us to examine ourselves, to be sure we are in the faith. The five foolish virgins had no oil for the very same reasons people continue to run out of gas, even when the flashing message on their instrument panel tells them they are. First, men don’t believe the warning signs. They don’t think things are as bad as they are reported to be. “I must have more gas than that!” Or, “I’ve gotten this same message before, and I’ve always been able to get to the gas station before running out.” Bottom line is that the word “extra” is not found in the Greek text, but has been supplied because the context is perceived to imply it. The Greek text indicates they brought no oil at all, meaning they never possessed salvation to begin with.  Actually, verse 5 says that the five foolish virgins took no oil with them. That one verse is a giant stink bomb on the notion that they were already saved believers running low on oil and were left out of the kingdom. The last part of verse 8 says that their lamps are gone out, not going out. This could imply that they are out period and were never lit in the first place because of the absence of oil. This is evident in verse 5 mentioned above. You mentioned that oil does not symbolize the Holy Spirit. In the Bible olive oil is mentioned several times as the oil used for lighting lamps (Leviticus 24:2; Exodus 27:20). Olive oil was also used for anointing oil (Exodus 30:23–25) and as part of the grain offerings (Leviticus 2:1–10). Kings were anointed with olive oil as a sign that they were chosen by God to rule (1 Samuel 16:1). As an important ingredient in the recipe for anointing oil, olive oil was used to sanctify priests (Exodus 29:7) and the tabernacle and all its furnishings (Exodus 40:9). Olive oil was also used in cooking. Olive trees grew in Israel (Deuteronomy 8:7–8), and the people in that region used the oil from pressed olives as people in other cultures might have used butter or animal fats. Olive oil was an important part of Jewish culture because of its many uses. Because of its centrality to much of Jewish life, olive oil was sometimes used as a symbol of richness, joy, and health (Jeremiah 31:12; Hebrews 1:9). Times of judgment were described as a season when “the olive oil fails” (Joel 1:10). Olive oil can also be seen as a symbol of the Holy Spirit (or possibly of faith) in Jesus’ parable of the ten virgins (Matthew 25:1–13). The five wise virgins in the wedding party had made sure they had olive oil for their lamps as they waited for the bridegroom to come. The five foolish virgins did not think ahead and had brought no oil. As the bridegroom drew near, the five foolish virgins begged the wise ones for some of their oil. But the wise virgins could not spare any. While the foolish virgins were out buying more oil, the bridegroom came, and their chance to join the wedding celebration was gone forever. Jesus gave the point of the parable: “Therefore keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour” (Matthew 25:13). At the end of the age, when Jesus comes back, some will be ready for His arrival (illustrated by the wise virgins who had olive oil); others will not be ready (symbolized by the foolish virgins who had no oil). Considering the olive oil as a symbol of the Holy Spirit (or of faith), we could say that only those who have the Spirit (or faith in Christ) are truly ready for Jesus’ second coming. Not every reference to olive oil in the Bible is symbolic, of course. But there are passages in which olive oil can be a picture of the Holy Spirit, the One who sanctifies us, fills us, readies us to see Christ, and brings us light, joy, and spiritual health. The bottom line of the parable of the ten virgins is that five were saved and five were not. The notion that the five foolish had oil and were running low doesn’t add up given the greek text and verse 5. This would indicate salvation by works which the Bible emphatically destroys.

JESUS AND GAMERS >END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – I’ll look at the other responses once I get a minute, but I wanted to chat on this one. In this parable, there is one thing for sure, Jesus spoke the words, and as such, I would tremble with reverence in making any kind of assumptions that are not stated here. You say the 5 foolish virgins did not have any oil. Jesus says that the 5 foolish virgins stated ‘our lamps are going out’. Jesus never said this was a lie or a deceitful statement. As such, you cannot make the assumption that they must have been lying. I would not dare make that kind of assumption, in particular when Jesus spoke the words. Just as the author could have added “no oil” Jesus could have also said “they lied”, but neither of which has happened. In addition, it says all 10 arose and trimmed their lamps. That means the lamps had to be on as to trim means to typically to change the setting to go brighter. You can’t go brighter if you have no light to begin with. Whether there was extra or not is not relevant since the extra comes in a vessel separate from the lamp. When a lamp is trimmed to expand the light, it has to be on, meaning while they slept, the lamps of all 10 were on. Again, I’m looking at this directly in the way it is written. To imply that the foolish virgins lied to seem “less foolish” is again an assumption, not a writing in the text. If I now try to draw a parallel, it isn’t difficult to interpret that the meaning is if you are not ready when Jesus returns, He leaves without you. It cannot be any more simple than that. This may just be something we agree to disagree. I am reading it directly as written with no external interpretation. These are the words directly from Jesus. Who am I to question? I would not dare. I’ll cross reference the others. Again, I am not trying to win or lose, but I want to get this right, and assumptions cannot be part of my research, only the word as written. I suppose the part about the oil was ‘gone out’ versus ‘going out’ is the key then. So KJV says gone out. NKJV says going out. Amplified version says going out. Amplified Classic says going out. RVES (Spanish version similar to Old King James Version) says will go out. Even when I check a website that shows the greek to english, it shows as going out. But regardless of the version, I now realize that gone out or going out isn’t really relevant. To have been going out, or gone out, means that at one point, there was oil in there. Otherwise, the lamp would have not have gone out, the proper statement would be “we need oil to light our lamp.”  You cannot have a lamp that went out unless you ran out of oil, which means you had oil at one point. So regardless if they took oil or not, the story as written applies and needs no additional context other than the obvious component here. As such, I see no contradiction with this story. I’ll write this out somewhat verse by verse so I can follow along. Again, taking directly out of the scripture with no assumptions unless noted. Romans 11 11-Salvation now available to Gentiles through the fall of Jews (Assuming rejection of Jesus) 13-Paul talking to Gentiles now, speaking well of his ministry 14-Wants to provoke Jews to salvation (assumption his flesh means his people) 15-Paul speaking it would be wonderful if they accept Jesus (the jews) 16-First Fruit (Jews) holy, the lump (gentiles) is holy..branches are holy because root (Christ) is holy 17-If some branches broke off (Jews) wild olive tree (gentiles) were grafted in and became partakers with Christ 18-Warning to gentiles not to boast about salvation 19-Gentiles may say (assumption of boast) they were broken so I could come into salvation 20-confirmation of the prior statement, but warning not to be haughty 21-Warning if God did not spare natural branches (Jews that were once in the Olive tree) He may not spare you either (Wild Olive Branches part of the tree) (Talking point: How can you be spared if you were not part of the tree..Gentile reference here as one already in the tree…meaning a person saved, because if you were not saved, you could not be part of the tree. You can’t be spared or not spared if you are not part of the tree) 22-Consider severity (Possibly the Jews) but toward you, goodness. (The goodness would represent gentiles in the tree, otherwise what would separate severity from goodness here). If you continue in His goodness. (Conditional statement included here for gentiles part of the tree). Talking point – Severity (being severed from the olive tree) came to the jews for unbelief. Immediately Paul speaks about goodness to the saved gentiles. How could goodness in this context come to a gentile that is unsaved? Then the goodness continues only IF you continue in His goodness. Who is the audience here? I checked. Romans 1:7, it shows Paul is addressing the church in Rome, so he is speaking with believers, not potential believers. The entire gentile reference here is to those that have believed already (gentiles) 23-Shows opportunity for Jews to come to the olive tree through salvation 24-Reference to better for Jews to return since they are natural branches 25-Reference that salvation to gentiles and that could be a help to jews to come to Christ 26-continued reference 27-continues 28-reminder that they may be enemies spiritually (gospel) but they are still God’s people 29-Gifts and calling are irrevocable – Talking point: What gifts? This comes immediately after making a reference to the Jewish people. Verse 28 goes back to the Jews to establish Jews as being the ‘Elect’ and are beloved for the sake of their fathers 29 For the gifts and calling of God….. This is referring to the Jews, not the gentiles. The calling of God is referring to being called God’s people. God chose them first, they are the called (That’s the call of God). The gift? God’s grace to them as not losing their position as God’s people. Perhaps (assumption) God’s mercy even though they denied Him? Who knows exactly which gift, but one this is for certain, this is a reference to the Jews due to the gift of the covenant with Abraham/Isaac/Jacob. 30-Verse 30 continues to the gentiles stating gentiles were once disobedient, but now obtained mercy through their disobedience. Talking point-Who is “their”. It comes right from the prior two verses. the Jews 31-Jews will obtain mercy just like we obtained mercy 32-God’s grace in display through mercy 33-Praise of God The rest is not relevant. I am reading this plainly and followed it through. John 6:27-29 Verse 27 says Do not labor for food which perishes, BUT for food which endures. Talking point-He calls us to labor towards food everlasting. 28-Question comes in about how they should work the “works of God”. Talking point-That question is about how they can replicate what God has done. Read directly it asks how they may work the works of God. 29-Jesus says this is the work of God Talking point-God does God’s work not us. We labor to continue seeking God So John 6:29 does not pose a problem at all when in fact if you see the preceding versus, Jesus specifically calls us to labor for food which endures. In the end, the more I research, the more I believe the following statement. John 3:16 says that ‘whoever believes’…this is an active verb, believing. We must continue to believe in Him. It does not say believed in a past tense, as in a one time only event. we must continue to believe. The more verses I find in scripture keep telling me we need to be alert, as with the 5 wise versions that remained prepared, and many other scriptures written by Paul. It seems you are actively doing the work of the Lord, which is amazing and you should always continue. I strive daily to be better, not because the amount of work will save me. This was already given to me,(Through the free gift of salvation upon my accepting) but because I love God, plain and simple. But I also know that I have to be in an active mode of believing Jesus is my Lord and Savior, and I need to work out that belief. The more I research, the more I see this plainly. I thank you so much for providing me scriptures to use in my research. God bless you.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCEDING > JESUS AND GAMERS – “But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not” (verse 12). Verse 12 indicates that Jesus never knew them. That indicates no oil. The Greek text indicates the false conception that the five foolish virgins ran out of oil. The text is clear on this point; the five foolish virgins never brought any oil with them. A footnote in the NET Bible indicates that the word “extra” is not found in the Greek text, but has been supplied because the context supposedly implied it. In fact, it does not imply it. Therefore, we need to rid ourselves of the false conception that the five foolish virgins ran out of oil. Surely the author is able to clearly supply this detail, so crucial to the interpretation of this parable. But he did not. Why do we wish to think they brought any oil with them? Perhaps it is because we read that the virgins claimed that their lamps were “going out” in verse 8. But in fact, they were not going out. In verse 12, we read where Jesus says to them “I know you not.” That means they were never saved to begin with. Would they all have been burning their torches for lighting the inside of the house where they all waited and slept? Would there not be the normal lighting in that place? Why would all five run out at the same time, just when they were preparing their lamps? This is a giant, putrid, smelly, rancid, vile, rank, disgusting stink bomb on the idea that the five foolish virgins were saved. But here’s the knockout punch to the five foolish virgins misconception. I saved the most potent stink bomb for last, and interestingly, it’s the vilest with only one word. That word is “all … 

“Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed” (1 Corinthians 15:51-52).

This verse of scripture is notably a verse about the approaching rapture of the true church. It’s not an accident that this revelation was given to the Corinthians. The Corinthians were notably the most carnal Christians of that time. They were doing everything from fornicating to getting drunk at communion. But yet, the verse says that we shall “all” be changed. This stands in stark contrast to the idea that the five foolish virgins are underperforming true, born again Christians left behind at the rapture. It also verifies that the foolish virgins part of the parable is mistranslated, as I’ve mentioned above. They had no oil. They’re not saved to begin with. This is most definitely not assumption, but it is verifiable fact. But like you, I’m not trying to win an argument. I’m just recognizing the fact that if the five foolish virgins are true born again believers, then we have a major contradiction in the bible … and that cannot be.  I would also just say that if one stops believing, they were never truly saved to begin with. 1 John 2:19 makes this clear …

“They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would no doubt have continued with us: but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us” (1 John 2:19).

There are Christians who are Christians who have only a head knowledge, but haven’t had a true born again experience. When one is truly saved and has true faith and belief in Christ, he or she is not going to start to disbelieve. But we’ll agree to disagree on this matter. Blessings to you as well.

JESUS AND GAMERS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – LAST DAYS: DARKNESS DESCENDING Thank you so much for your time and patience. I wanted to double check if you had any thoughts on the Romans 11 response I sent. That would complete my research for that passage. God bless you.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JESUS AND GAMERS – It is talking about God not ever taking away His Covenant of Mercy and Calling from the Jewish people/Israel. Yes, that is just one of the gifts and callings that are irrevocable. The word “gift” has the letter “s” on the end of it, meaning more than one gift … meaning God’s gifts in general. “ALL” of his gifts and callings. The subject matter of this particular scripture just happens to have been God not ever taking away his covenant of Mercy from Israel. But Paul states that it will not be revoked because of God’s overall position that the gifts (plural) are not taken back. It is a statement of the fact that gifts of God PERIOD are not revoked, not just the one referred to in Romans 11. The subject matter in Romans 11 just so happens to be the one that they were talking about at that particular moment. The irrevocable gifts extend to the gentile world as well, not just the Jews.

JESUS AND GAMERS > END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING – Hey there. I had a revelation this morning I thought I would share with you. Would you say the Garden of Eden was a gift from God? Would you say our original ability to live forever on earth was a gift? How about the gift of life itself? From the very beginning, God gave us these very precious gifts. Due to our disobedience (rejection), we lost those gifts (rejected the gift). Then we have the promised land for the Jews. They were promised the gift, but in the time of Moses, on their way to the promised land to inherit, their lack of faith, or disobedience caused God to send them on a 40 year detour, which means many of them died and did not obtain that promise. Moses himself, only got to see it from afar, but the Lord denied him the land because of disobedience. In the promised land, how many times did the Jews disobey, causing them to be enslaved or have their territories taken over. God did not revoke it, but they rejected it through their disobedience along the way. King Saul was given the gift of the Holy Spirit, even though he was not a levite. Yet because he disobeyed, God removed that gift from Him. I believe in the scripture, that God’s gift are irrevokable. He won’t take them away Himself, but that is different than saying God’s gifts are not rejectable or returnable. We have many examples where God has provided something to His people, and they have lost it mostly because of disobedience, worshipping idols, etc. How long was Israel without their promised land? For centuries, Jews were without their promised land until sometime last century. The promised land was exactly that, a “Promised” land, which was an amazing gift God had provided, but they threw it away. If we look at a personal situation of mine. For a long time, years ago, I prayed constantly for a job that would allow me to buy a house. This prayer was answered and was a wonderful gift from God. However, I disobeyed the word of God. I did not tithe, I did not give offerings to those in need. I ended up losing that house. I believe God did not remove it, but I rejected the gift because I disobeyed the word of God. I am sure there are countless times. My wife prayed super hard 2 years ago for the Lord to confirm I was the person she was to marry. She asked for a very specific confirmation that most would have said “No Way would God make that happen”, but He did. He gave us each other. We are now married and are serving the Lord together, and the ministries we are working in have an insane amount of fruit. But what happens if she cheats on me? What happens if she decided to break off the marriage? She would be rejecting God’s gift and if I divorced her, she has now lost that gift due to her own rejection. One other personal potential example. The house I have now is without a doubt a gift from God. I didn’t have enough for a down payment. God provided a miracle. My credit was not even good enough to get a credit card. Yet God provided me this house. We prayed over getting this house, and many others. Confirmation after confirmation. Definitely without a doubt, a gift from God. But what happens if I chose not to pay the mortgage? Eventually, I will lose this house. By not following on my committment to pay for the house, I will have thrown away the gift that God gave me. How many gifts have people thrown out that God has given them over the centuries? Many we will never hear about of course. God’s gifts are never limited, and certainly go far and beyond the ones in the Bible. I don’t send this to you to change your mind, but rather as a thinking point and example of how a gift or promise can be rejected. I don’t believe He will ever ask us to return a gift, or remove it by force, but rather, there are countless examples of us rejecting His gifts. Just like King Saul had the Holy Spirit leave because of His disobedience, I believe we can lose our salvation because of the same reason. I felt this morning to share this revelation with you that I had not previously considered. God bless you.

END TIMES:  DARKNESS DESCENDING > JESUS AND GAMERS – The Bible also contains some strong warnings against apostasy. These warnings have led some to doubt the doctrine of eternal security. After all, if we cannot lose our salvation, why are we warned against falling away from the Lord? This is a good question. First, we must understand what is meant by “apostasy.” An apostate is someone who abandons his religious faith. It is clear from the Bible that apostates are people who made professions of faith in Jesus Christ but never genuinely received Him as Savior. They were pretend believers. Those who turn away from Christ never really trusted Him to begin with, as 1 John 2:19 says,

“They went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us” (1 John 2:19).

Those who apostatize are simply demonstrating that they are not true believers, and they never were. The Parable of the Wheat and the Tares (Matthew 13:24–30) provides a simple illustration of apostasy. In the same field were growing wheat and “false wheat” (tares or weeds). At first, the difference between the two types of plants was undetectable, but as time went on, the weeds were seen for what they were. In the same way, in any given church today, there may be true, born-again believers side by side with pretenders—those who enjoy the messages, the music, and the fellowship but have never repented of their sins and accepted Christ by faith. To any human observer, the true believer and the pretender look identical. Only God can see the heart. Matthew 13:1–9 (the Parable of the Sower) is another illustration of apostasy in action. The Bible’s warnings against apostasy exist because there are two types of religious people: believers and unbelievers. In any church there are those who truly know Christ and those who are going through the motions. Wearing the label “Christian” does not guarantee a change of heart. It is possible to hear the Word, and even agree with its truth, without taking it to heart. It is possible to attend church, serve in a ministry, and call yourself a Christian—and still be unsaved (Matthew 7:21–23). As the prophet said …

These people come near to me with their mouth and honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me” (Isaiah 29:13; cf. Mark 7:6).

God warns the pretender who sits in the pew and hears the gospel Sunday after Sunday that he is playing with fire. Eventually, a pretender will apostatize—he will “fall away” from the faith he once professed—if he does not repent. Like the tares among the wheat, his true nature will be manifest. The passages warning against apostasy serve two primary purposes. First, they exhort everyone to be sure of their salvation. One’s eternal destiny is not a trifling matter. Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians 13:5 to examine ourselves to see whether we are “in the faith.” One test of true faith is love for others (1 John 4:7–8). Another is good works. Anyone can claim to be a Christian, but those who are truly saved will bear “fruit.” A true Christian will show, through words, actions, and doctrine, that he follows the Lord. Christians bear fruit in varying degrees based on their level of obedience and their spiritual gifts, but all Christians bear fruit as the Spirit produces it in them (Galatians 5:22–23). Just as true followers of Jesus Christ will be able to see evidence of their salvation (see 1 John 4:13), apostates will eventually be made known by their fruit (Matthew 7:16–20) or lack thereof (John 15:2). The second purpose for the Bible’s warnings against apostasy is to equip the church to identify apostates. They can be known by their rejection of Christ, acceptance of heresy, and carnal nature (2 Peter 2:1–3). The biblical warnings against apostasy, therefore, are warnings to those who are under the umbrella of “faith” without ever having truly exercised faith. Scriptures such as Hebrews 6:4–6 and Hebrews 10:26–29 are warnings to “pretend” believers that they need to examine themselves before it’s too late. Matthew 7:22–23 indicates that “pretend believers” whom the Lord rejects on Judgment Day are rejected not because they “lost faith” but because the Lord never knew them. They never had a relationship with Him. There are many people who love religion for religion’s sake and are willing to identify themselves with Jesus and the church. Who wouldn’t want eternal life and blessing? However, Jesus warns us to “count the cost” of discipleship (Luke 9:23–26; 14:25–33). True believers have counted the cost and made the commitment; apostates fail to do so. Apostates had a profession of faith at one time but not the possession of faith. Their mouths spoke something other than what their hearts believed. Apostasy is not loss of salvation but evidence of past pretension. Further, the Bible reveals us ( a born again Christian) to be a purchased possession. The Holy Spirit will not falter in his work in keeping us in the faith and rejecting our faith, that is unless was never truly in the faith to begin with as stated above. The bible also declares that we are “sealed unto the day of redemption.” That is pretty strong language. We must also remember that the new covenant of salvation through Christ is based upon better promises, as Hebrew 8:6 establishes …

“But now hath he obtained a more excellent ministry, by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant, which was established upon better promises” (Hebrews 8:6).

So then, at the end of the day, the conditional salvation view has no biblical merit and is a Satanically spawned doctrine that is meant to destroy the gift of peace that we have obtained through Jesus Christ.  It is a cancer to the spirit and needs to be shown for what it really is using the correct discernment and dividing of the word.  As Isaiah puts it …

“For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little …” (Isaiah 28:10).

When this is done, there is only one conclusion to the matter … salvation cannot be lost if truly possessed to begin with.  The rest … well … it’s disgusting.  Vomit it out of your system before it poisons you.

throw up

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: